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Monngie

Monngie
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  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    I have to kinda disagree with you regarding the 1%. Maybe some of the members of Congress meet the criteria of the 1%, but most aren't the 1%, they are owned by they 1%.

    No one believes taxing the 1% will solve all our problems. Not taxing them presents a huge problem. One of fairness. They already own 40% of the country. When will we be satisfied, when they own 90%???
    Oct 21, 2011. 11:47 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf says "there's no merit" to yesterday's call by House Democrats for a Justice Department investigation into possible collusion by the big banks to raise debit card fees and other monthly charges. "The economics of the business have changed due to regulatory and legislative reform," Stumpf says, and the new debit card fees are merely "a test to see how we can best deal with these changes." (video)  [View news story]
    Holy Crap, you mean we might all have to use cash? This is unheard of!!!!!

    When my bank charges me for my debit card, I'll show them my scissors.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:45 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Former GE CEO Jack Welch rips Pres. Obama's support for a millionaire's tax as "a transfer payment. You take it from one pan, put it in the other. It doesn’t work." On the administration: "They are spenders... They don’t believe jobs come from the private sector. They believe government creates jobs."  [View news story]
    XLS didn't even mention the mult-million dollar bonuses to executives some of which failed miserably at there jobs. At least if a 100 dollar electrician fails you just blow a fuse, or the electrician gets electrocuted or something.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Former GE CEO Jack Welch rips Pres. Obama's support for a millionaire's tax as "a transfer payment. You take it from one pan, put it in the other. It doesn’t work." On the administration: "They are spenders... They don’t believe jobs come from the private sector. They believe government creates jobs."  [View news story]
    OVERBID2002 you nailed that one.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:32 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Former GE CEO Jack Welch rips Pres. Obama's support for a millionaire's tax as "a transfer payment. You take it from one pan, put it in the other. It doesn’t work." On the administration: "They are spenders... They don’t believe jobs come from the private sector. They believe government creates jobs."  [View news story]
    But none of them mentioned that you may be a poster child for a failed public education system. Or, maybe it is a good system and you just didn't pay attention.

    I don't think you paid attention.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:27 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Former GE CEO Jack Welch rips Pres. Obama's support for a millionaire's tax as "a transfer payment. You take it from one pan, put it in the other. It doesn’t work." On the administration: "They are spenders... They don’t believe jobs come from the private sector. They believe government creates jobs."  [View news story]
    1980XLS

    I don't know what Tigersam's first language is, but, I suspect you would never be able to master it as well as he has mastered English.

    BTW, the the top 10% control 93% of the wealth.

    47% pay nothing because they are poorer than S#!+. If they're enjoying the fruits of this nation, they're getting it from a dumpster. What don't you understand about that you (*&%*.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:23 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Former GE CEO Jack Welch rips Pres. Obama's support for a millionaire's tax as "a transfer payment. You take it from one pan, put it in the other. It doesn’t work." On the administration: "They are spenders... They don’t believe jobs come from the private sector. They believe government creates jobs."  [View news story]
    Yep, they'd be on him like a pack of do nothing rats.
    Oct 21, 2011. 10:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    Well, about 40% of the 99% are living in poverty and lucky to eat from day to day. 10% are unemployed because the 1% shipped there jobs off shore to slave laborers. 20% of the 99% are lower middle income with kids to raise. The other 29% could probably save and amass wealth.

    Now you may understand why they're in the streets, but, I doubt it. And besides it's all their fault isn't it with all that minimum wage crap.
    Oct 20, 2011. 07:02 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    You don't have to go through all 100 bills just point me in the right direction. I'm usually pretty good at ferreting out BS on-line, but, I can't find the 100 bills you contend.

    Additionally, of the 100 bills how many of the created 1 job. I don't think any of them did. It's not in the Republicans interest to create even one job before the election, and they won't.

    I don't think either of us are able to discuss 4225 regulatory actions. Some may be good, all may be good, some may be bad, all may be bad. To throw our 4225 regulatory actions as if they are all bad is just plain incoherent. Go through the 4225 peices of regulatory actions and get back with me. I am not a fan of over regulation, but, some regulations are necessary to insure safe food, consumer products, air, water and many other things. We cannot rely on business to police itself......been there, done that. It didn't work and history is the proof of my contention.

    I fully understand that spending in this country is RUNNING the economy not RUINING it. And I would argue more spending is in order at this time in certain areas of the economy (Infrastructure, space, and basic research) while other areas need to be trimmed back. Indeed, we've had this discussion before also and I pretty much agree with your opinion in many areas. I just don't think spending cuts AT THIS TIME are prudent. In the future, spending cuts are absolutely necessary. I will say that we could start cutting defense right now and continue that trend over the next several years so it doesn't shock our defense industries, they'll know its coming and adjust for it.

    Right now, every effort, every carrot, every stick, should be employed to bring jobs back to the United States. That is the best way to fix our economy. Unemployed Americans and slave labor in China and elsewhere don't pay taxes and American businesses don't pay taxes on profits made off shore. Additionally, they are hoarding over a trillion dollars in profits off shore.

    Davidbdc, as I mentioned before we are very close to being kindred spirits, we agree on many things. Our only disagreements seem to be timing. I am a fiscal conservative that happens to believe the government can make a big difference by investing in science and technology through basic research, maintaining a robust infrastructure, and steering our economy into the future with tax breaks for businesses that are pushing the envelop bringing to market technologies that will replace older obsolete methods.
    Oct 20, 2011. 06:09 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    Yes, by all means dismiss the voice of thousands of people across the country because of a Che Guevarra poster.

    The legitimate complaints are why they're there.

    And I think the American People (99%) are pissed off enough to persist and prevail.

    1% owning 40% of the wealth is cause enough for a "French Revolution" type moment. Occupy Wall St. should probably invest in a guillotine if for no other reason than to drive home a point.

    Chop, Chop
    Oct 20, 2011. 05:21 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    It is true that there are a lot of messages. And it is incoherent to some extent. But there is a common thread. Wall Street and Washington has screwed the poor and middle class (99%). That's pretty simple and coherent.

    Now you can disagree with that, but, I don't know how.

    Also, they don't have big money behind them. The Koch bothers aren't providing any of their treasure. But, they are getting grassroots contributions.

    They are irrelevant and they will become more focused and coherent. This is not going to end.

    I'm a child of the 60's and I think it's about time the American People made their voices heard even if it is incoherent for now. It's a breath of fresh air to me. Much better than sitting on the couch, getting up periodically and bending over.
    Oct 17, 2011. 01:14 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    You know very well my views on spending. They pretty much agree with yours.........we've had that discussion.

    Your going to have to "show me" on the over 100 bills. I can't find it anywhere.

    We've had the discussion on the budgets. The budgets they propose harken back to the 1930's. You know the ones that sent us back into the Great Depression. These budgets are just plain stupid and DO NOT constitute doing something. They are worse than doing nothing.

    I agree we have to get our spending house in order, but, not at the expense of throwing the economy into a depression. Lets get the economy working again and then control our spending. In the mean time, spend our money on infrastructure, basic research, tax cuts for small business and the middle class, and other things we will benefit from in the future.
    Oct 15, 2011. 12:18 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    Lower taxes on the rich????

    Will you be happy when they pay no taxes and the middle class pays for everything?????

    I'll bet you will!!!!
    Oct 14, 2011. 12:12 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    I would agree with that.

    Obama didn't make it worse. Although, I will agree that I don't agree with what he did entirely, the things they did brought us back onto the cliff Bush launched us off, just as the door was hitting him in the ass.

    It's hard for him to do anything substative with a congress that has "NO" for a motto. That's what needs to be changed, a do nothing Republican House and a Senate with too many Republicans.
    Oct 13, 2011. 06:14 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Wall Street protesters have been sold a bill of goods, Peter Wallison writes: Reckless government policies, not private greed, brought about the housing bubble and resulting financial crisis. The private financial sector "cannot fairly be accused of causing the crisis when only a small minority of subprime mortgages outstanding in 2008 were the result of that private activity."  [View news story]
    Probably not so much from government service. The influence peddling certainly did the trick. He's in tight with the Bushes. Him and GH are buds.
    Oct 12, 2011. 09:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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