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WmHilger1

WmHilger1
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  • Southern Company Is The Most Attractive High-Yield American Utilities Stock [View article]
    As I learned while taking many multiple choice tests many years ago, a statement such as "Every income investor would be wise to ensure that their portfolio contains one or two utilities stocks" is inherently WRONG! I do not own any utility stocks and probably never will again. I buy only stocks that will pay me at least 6% dividends, and preferably 10-12%.

    In my younger days, I fell for that propaganda and even owned some SO and Iowa Resources (?IOR?) "once upon a time". I got rid of them when I learned how many medium risk high yield stocks there are available (about 50 in my portfolio, at latest look).
    Sep 26 09:58 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Mitigating Effect Of Reinvesting Dividends [View article]
    An interesting article that I find difficult to argue with, so I won't! I agree with many parts of it and disagree with others.

    However, I find that a reasonably sized portfolio heavily invested in a suitable diversity of medium risk, high yield stocks will effectively mitigate just about any investment environment, if your standard of living is also closely geared and highly coordinated to stay within the cash thrown off by that portfolio. Notice that I said diverse and high yield as well as standard of living. Lack of any one of those points can easily screw up the whole investment scheme, but expecting too much for the living standard, or an inability to modify it, can be the worst. In effect, "You can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear".
    Sep 25 04:16 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividends Vs. Capital Appreciation: Wrong Question [View article]
    En Francais - Il n'y a pas argumenter sur le goût. On ne marie pas une poule avec un canard.
    Sep 23 08:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividends Vs. Capital Appreciation: Wrong Question [View article]
    Dividends are here and now! Capital Gains are maybe someday! I will, and do, take good high-yield dividends over capital growth any day! And potential 300% CG is gambling, not investing! More people have gone broke looking for 300% gains than have ever done the same while pocketing dividends.

    Even in 2008-2009 while many highly regarded stocks went bust, I continued to collect very good dividends. I lived on those dividends and bought more shares of MRHY (medium risk, high yield) stocks which have appreciated up to 4 times their purchase price, either through outright CG or through purchases using my incoming dividends.

    BTW, I hate Qdoba, both as a stock and as a restaurant! You will never have to compete with me in either manner!
    Sep 23 10:21 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Growing Problem For Income Investors [View article]
    My firm thought is that any program or company that takes part of your money to do what you could do yourself is non-accretive to your asset base! They are marginally useful if you have neither the time nor knowledge to do you own investing. After all, an annual fee of 1.2% equals 12.67% when compounded over 10 years. In other words, your assets would be 12.67% LESS after that time period UNLESS the program works well enough better than your own investing to make up for those fees.

    I do my own investing. It is my hobby. I enjoy it and gain considerable income from it. Each year, I figuratively take $10,000 out of one pocket and put it into another to pay myself for an activity for which I seem to have the abilities and interest. I pay NO ONE for any advice or handholding. In fact, I tend to do just the opposite of any of the talking heads on TV, or any other media pundits.
    Sep 18 10:02 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    Didn't happen to me! Are you sure we are discussing the same VGR? As I said, I now own 3,031 shares, each of which pays exactly the same dividends. I owned 2,887 shares before the stock dividend in September, 2013, and 3,031 after receiving 144 more.

    Maybe our brokers are reporting the same things in different ways? Mine is TD Ameritrade. There is NO indication of a stock split in 2013; just the stock dividend of 144 shares and a minor amount of cash.
    Sep 13 11:54 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    Pen, I finally discerned what you were trying to say in the above message. It is false! You are working under a misconception that the number of shares I held in 2013 remained unchanged when I received the 144 share stock dividend and that "2013 shares are (worth) 1.05 2014 shares" so that I still owned 2,887 shares. NOT TRUE. The number of VGR shares that I owned before September of 2013 was 2,887. I received 144 more shares plus cash for a fractional share. I now own 3,031 shares of VGR, all equal to each other in every way (except for their source)! i expect to own 3,182 shares plus a little cash in about 2 weeks.

    Apparently, using the surname of a possibly fictitious king doesn't make a person impervious to misconceptions. I can understand. Sometimes things are not as complicated as a person thinks they might be. You really had me confused!
    Sep 12 09:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Your Guide To The Best And Worst Stocks In The Dow [View article]
    I consider myself a definite "buy-and-hold" investor and there are some stocks that I have owned for 30 years or more. However, I also find that my portfolio turns over at the rate of about 20% per year due to circumstances of various kinds. So, I can't believe there are actually people who "never" sell a stock. They may think they don't, but I'll bet a peek at their annual tax forms do show some activity in Schedule D. "Never" is a mighty long time and people's memories forget.
    Sep 12 02:17 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    I don't understand what you are trying to tell me! I am getting paid $0.40 PER SHARE right now on every share of VGR stock that I own. Prior to September of 2013, I was receiving $1,154.80 quarterly from VGR. It is presently $1,212.40. I bought no additional shares in the interim. The difference in cash received is due entirely to the 2013 stock dividend. There were no other happenings with my VGR holdings. I work on the cash basis ONLY!!!!!! Every part of my VGR stock holdings could be sold for exactly the same amount per share, and pays the same dividends, regardless of when or how I acquired it, now or prior to 2014.
    Sep 11 05:45 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    Well then, how many stocks does he own or is he just a contributor? I own over 100K shares and live on the dividends, plus investing the surplus. I won't even consider buying a stock paying less than 6% and very few of those. Maybe T or RAI or such, but preferably 9% and up!
    Sep 11 05:27 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    Pen, of course the actual cash dividend amounts do increase after I receive the stock dividends. I'm talking about the stated 40 cent quarterly dividends per share. Those have remained the same for several years, but $0.40 times 3,000 is still obviously greater than $0.40 times 2,000. And each year's stock dividend is also greater than the year before. Thus, I receive more cash each quarter while also increasing my holding in VGR every year.
    Sep 11 11:56 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    And I find that stocks with a dividend in the range of 9% to 13% tend to perform better for a person like me. I have growth of over 100% on 5 of them, between 50% and 100% on 3, and between 20% and 50% on 9, plus an average current dividend of 10.115% across my entire portfolio of about 55 issues. You go your way; I'll go mine, and be glad that I do.
    Sep 11 11:40 AM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    "Berkshire has never bought any REITs - listed or unlisted." And. correspondingly, I have never bought any BRK!!!!!!! And, done quite well without it!
    Sep 11 09:21 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    Scenic --- I'm not sure what you are talking about. I have owned VGR for several years and have not noticed any change in the actual dividends paid. I have received the normal reported cash dividends each year AND the 5% stock dividends. But then, I don't read the charts anyhow!

    One thing that a person does have to do is to file a 1040X near the end of each year when VGR restates a portion of their prior tax year regular dividends as LTCG (Long Term Capital Gain), thus changing it from taxable to non-taxable and creating a dividend refund of the 15% taxes paid on it earlier in the year. If you don't do that, you don't get the refund. But that is to be expected due to the real estate holdings and, for me, certainly worth doing in order to get that several hundred dollars of refund each year! Better late than never!!!!!!!!
    Sep 11 09:13 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Look At These Juicy Yields - Are They Really Appropriate For Your Retirement Portfolios? [View article]
    B&H --- you confuse me, or is it you who is confused?. Isn't high yield part of dividend growth? It is for me! My high yield stocks have grown considerably through reinvestment of those very yields into more stocks, either of the originating company or of other high yield stocks, which leads to more high yields, which leads to more stocks, etc.
    Sep 11 08:53 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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