Seeking Alpha

WmHilger1

WmHilger1
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View WmHilger1's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Retirement Strategy: Dividends Vs. Capital Gains [View article]
    True, but a little disingenuous, don't you think? If I can achieve the same results without paying the "small annual fee", I am effectively earning that fee myself, and I don't have to pay Income tax or Social Security taxes on it. It is essentially a phantom untaxed and unknown income to me for choosing to spend my time handling my own investments.

    I can and do also learn a lot this way, for which I might have had to pay someone tuition while spending my time during that learning process. All in all, I think that "Do Your Own" investing is a win-win situation for anyone who cares much about their investments. And, Income Investing does NOT require sales of shares as you cite for Total Return Investing. You can keep your stocks or not, depending on how you view their past and future performances, while letting the dividends take care of their selves (or spending them)!
    Apr 17, 2015. 07:43 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: Dividends Vs. Capital Gains [View article]
    My thoughts exactly! If those fund managers are getting wealthy running their funds, then I believe that I, and many others, can do the same without the overhead! I pay NO ONE for managing my investments, when I, and only I, have MY best interests at heart.

    If I make a bobble here and there, so what? Those fund managers aren't perfect either! And, if I make a bobble, I can try to figure out why, and improve my performance in the future. I'm a fast learner when it comes to my own money being involved (LOL)!
    Apr 17, 2015. 03:58 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Retirement Strategy: Dividends Vs. Capital Gains [View article]
    Great article, RS (;-} . I agree with you on almost every point! However, I like to take my income investing one step farther and buy high yielding stocks with (what I evaluate as) a medium amount of inherent risk. I found long ago that my income flow is much higher this way, utilizing these stocks that pay me an average of 12.5% annual dividends, while also suffering relatively few setbacks (generally no more than the blue chip stocks)! And, when those setbacks do occur, instead of pulling in my horns, I buy MORE stocks at bargain basement prices with the leftover amounts from my taxes and living expenses.

    IMHO, a great way to build a sizeable portfolio concurrently with a sizable income! And that is what I HAVE done!!!!!!
    Apr 17, 2015. 10:14 AM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The MLP Story That Few Appreciate, And How To Make Money From Their Mistake [View article]
    RIP, At the time of our recent discussion about UBTI, I wasn't fully aware that we were talking about two different kinds of investments. You were talking about IRAs and I was talking about Personal taxable investments. UBTI is not even a consideration on taxable investments, so I NEVER worry about it. I also NEVER put tax sheltered investments in tax sheltered accounts!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Very inefficient use of my money and also probably more trouble than it is worth!

    Sorry for the misunderstandings!
    Apr 12, 2015. 11:46 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    Peace, I invest mainly in MLP, BDC, and REIT stocks, with a smattering of others such as tobacco (VGR for their annual 5% stock dividends) and (big maybe and infrequently) communications.
    Apr 12, 2015. 10:56 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    My home state also does not recognize Qualified Dividends as "qualified" for any tax reductions. I still pay the full state income tax rate of 6.4% on them. I don't, however, pay 33% FIT or any surcharges, YET! Just 25% and AMT (;-{ !

    I do, though, still prefer to collect dividend income. That way, I get to keep the "goose that laid the golden egg"!
    Apr 12, 2015. 10:49 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    BHN, why not do as I do; ignore the estimated tax forms and have ALL of your estimated taxes withheld from your income sources? You can do this, quite easily and legally, from any wages you receive, Social Security benefits, annuities, and your brokerage account. And, best of all, at any time during the year, if you find that your previous estimates were wrong, just file new W-2 forms decreasing or increasing the amount(s) of the payments between then and year end.

    It takes a little calculating to figure out what amounts to have withheld from which income source (the SSA withholding can't be more than 25% of your benefits) and what changes to make during the year, but it is worth it to NOT have to file those damnable ES forms!

    To my knowledge, the IRS considers ALL withholdings to be timely paid as long as they are done in the calendar year owed. You can't have insufficient quarterly estimated taxes and penalties for that, when you don't even file an ES form!
    Apr 12, 2015. 08:42 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    I sell or give away portions of successful MLP stocks. Pro rata parts of the tax deferred distributions then go with them and are someone else's business. If the person to whom you gave it has a small enough income from other source when they finally sell, the tax ramifications are minimal or even non-existent! I thus have my cake while it is still fresh and tasty and pass it on when it is getting stale and a potential tax burden.

    BTW, the deferred losses don't pass when I give the cake away since they only pass when I divest myself of my ENTIRE interest in the holding. So, I save that frosting to use at a later time when I really need it! And, if I am careful, I can thereby time things so that I eventually pay little or no taxes, while still getting the benefits that went with my original ownership of the entire holding!

    Also, the people to whom I give it are extremely thankful to get it, even with the attached problems, in as much as they had NO cake before I offered mine! To them, any cake is better than no cake! And, I do discuss those pluses and minuses of me giving them the cake. I have never had anyone turn down my gift (;-o) !
    Apr 11, 2015. 06:31 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    IMO, YOC is a misleading and nearly useless figure. It is good only for self-information as to whether you originally made a good buy or not. I also keep mine available in case I want to unload a company, but the most important thing is "What has the stock done for me lately?" It doesn't much matter what you paid for the stock AFTER you have already bought it!!!! It is what it is doing for you NOW, relative to what comparable stocks are doing. In other words, should I continue to hold it or would I be better served to dump it and buy a better yielding alternative.

    I am doing that very thing right now --- divesting myself of 7% to 9% stocks and replacing them with 10% to 15 percenters. And my income is steadily going UP with hardly any change in risk, due to the bargains that are now avilable.
    Apr 11, 2015. 12:54 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • $48k Per Year With A Half A Million Portfolio [View article]
    Cash, As the inventor of the acronym MRHY, I want to take this opportunity to say, "Congratulations on seeing through the fog and (TRULY) investing in "Medium Risk, High Yield" stocks. You are doing well but I am doing "weller"! I AVERAGE 12.5% on my ~$1.75K MRHY portfolio, giving me >$200K annual income, from which I also withdraw about $125K annually for living expenses. I don't even touch stocks that pay me less than 10% dividend yield during these days of fire sales on so many good companies.

    I must admit that my portfolio is down over $300K in the last couple years of that kind of panic selling, but my dividends are doing better than ever. However, I firmly intend to "stay the course" and continue to buy (and HOLD) more and more MRHY stocks. Paper profits and losses may well be what many (so called) "investors" spend their time with, but I prefer DIVIDENDS!!!!!

    May I suggest that you go online to http://bit.ly/I81bHK and find some of the kinds of stocks that I prefer. In fact, as one MRHY investor to another, even though you don't call yourself that, if you will contact me by PM, I will slip you a few symbols that pay me 10% to 15%, and have done so for several years!
    Apr 11, 2015. 10:37 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Wall Street Breakfast: Shell Agrees To Buy BG Group For $69.6B [View article]
    Too many damn parasites collecting government money for not working, or ever, in their entire lives, contributing to the economy.

    BTW, I DO NOT consider Social Security recipients as parasites.
    Apr 8, 2015. 10:12 AM | 18 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 18.59% Edge For 5 Strategic Dividend Index High Yield, Low Price Stocks In March Quarter [View article]
    Those are high yielding stocks???? Phooey!!! I get 12.5% across the board on my portfolio!
    Apr 7, 2015. 06:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10.87% Advantage To 5 BDC Highest Yield, Lowest Price, April Dogs [View article]
    FULL very recently cut its monthly dividend to $0.035. The information in this article does appear to be very sadly outdated.
    Apr 6, 2015. 09:39 AM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 10.87% Advantage To 5 BDC Highest Yield, Lowest Price, April Dogs [View article]
    I also have a problem with this article. I own at least 1,000 shares in each of the top 8 stocks listed here. My latest spread sheet says that the unweighted average of the dividends paid by those 8 companies is 12.94%. That is a nice yield but certainly not earth-shaking.

    Those figures are calculated on the actual pure dividend yields provided by my broker, TDAmeritrade as of 3/31/15. No unrealized capital gains or other income from them is included. And yes, the top earners among those 8 are somewhat greater than the bottom ones, but they range from 16.194 for OXLC to a low of 9.863 for FSC, which is badly misstated here!

    BTW, for those who have asked for samples of my portfolio, these 8 stocks are out of 14 BDCs that I own. Enjoy! (;-} !
    Apr 5, 2015. 01:05 PM | 4 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The MLP Story That Few Appreciate, And How To Make Money From Their Mistake [View article]
    RIP, Since I have been buying MLP stocks since 1982 (and BDC and REIT stocks), and preparing my own tax returns until just a few years ago, I think I am pretty conversant with the Form 1065, Partner's Instructions for Schedule K-1. I KNOW my CPA is "qualified" because I talked about some of these things before I hired him.

    He did screw up once on my Form 8606 where I had contributed after-tax money to my IRA, but that is something that very few people even know was possible to do back before they had Roth IRAs.

    I am also an IT expert, especially Lotus 123 and Excel, as I may have mentioned in my bio, as well as government bureaucratic gobble-de-gook, having worked with those specialties of the financial world during my working years. I have all of my K-1 forms on record, plus the taxable ramifications of their data, such as what taxes (and losses) can or must be deferred and when. I didn't acquire a $1.25M portfolio without knowing most of the tax laws that pertain to my situation(s), or at least where to find them.
    Apr 4, 2015. 07:37 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
1,295 Comments
2,452 Likes