Seeking Alpha

gfmn2000

gfmn2000
Send Message
View as an RSS Feed
View gfmn2000's Comments BY TICKER:
Latest  |  Highest rated
  • Retirement Strategy: When Should We Sell Shares? [View article]
    Early in my investing I bought with the intention of selling. Make a profit, sell and move on. Gradually I began to see companies I sold continue to make gains year after year. They were generally high quality, financially strong companies that had consistent rising earnings and dividends. My worst investment decisions were selling great companies. Now I buy with the intention of holding forever. Wasted effort that use to go to constantly moving in and out of investments is now spent identifying the highest quality dividend growth stocks I can find that fit my goals. I will sell when something goes fundamentally wrong with an investment, not when things are going right.
    Apr 24 10:13 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What Is 'Quality' In A Stock? [View article]
    David,

    Thanks for the article on quality. For the core of my portfolio I want the highest quality that I can identify. It is subjective but that is what I aim for.

    Of the companies in your article I have 23 of them and would not hesitate to own several more if I could get them at a value price. And glad to see JNJ passes all five tests. It was the first stock I bought with dividend growth as an objective in mind. Bought it in Feb 2006.

    One thing that stands out to me though is GM in the QUAL ETF. How the heck does that happen with the criteria they list? Don't get me wrong I like GM products. I drive a Chevy 4x4 truck that I bought new in 1999 and it has been an excellent vehicle. But I would not buy the stock as a quality core holding.

    And I am somewhat surprised ADP did not make some of the lists.
    Apr 24 08:46 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Coca-Cola Or Microsoft: The Other Side [View article]
    Tradevestor,

    I own both MSFT and KO. But I do agree with your article. I view KO as a fairly safe investment with likely returns in the 7 to 10% range over the next 10 to 20 years. MSFT is a good value but many more variables will come in to play in determining how well it does.
    Apr 24 06:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Coca-Cola Or Microsoft: The Other Side [View article]
    >>>His pick of Coke over MS shows he hasn't been following the strong anti-obesity wave<<<

    That is interesting and got me thinking. Reckon sitting on our butts in front of these computers all day has anything to do with obesity. I am gonna finish my coke, shut down windows and get on the treadmill.
    Apr 23 08:05 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Manage Your Dividend Portfolio [View article]
    Buyandhold 2012,

    I certainly hope you continue to comment. Your experience and success are an inspiration. There are new and old investors that need to hear it.

    In fact just this past Sunday a young man (about 30 years old) told me about how much a stock he sold went up and keeps going up. I told him about you and your comments here. And then I told him he needed to study the Dividend Aristocrats and Champions and buy them when they are at a good value. And buy them with the intention of never selling.
    Now I gave him this same advice about a year of so ago and he paid it no attention. I think now he is beginning to listen a little. 
    Apr 22 09:49 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Manage Your Dividend Portfolio [View article]
    Dividend Growth Investor,

    Your article is great advice for anyone holding a portfolio of high quality, financially strong dividend growth stocks. As I noted in a comment earlier my worst decisions have been in selling great companies. Since changing to dividend growth I resist the urge to sell winners. Unless the fundamentals deteriorate I let them grow. Now that many of my DG holdings have been in my portfolio 7, 8, 9 years and longer I am beginning to see the benefits of being patient.
    Apr 22 07:33 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • How To Manage Your Dividend Portfolio [View article]
    Buyandhold 2012,

    Your comments make a lot of sense. My worst investment decisions have been in selling great companies.

    I was thinking you should write a book. But it would only need to be a few paragraphs. And I sincerely mean that as a compliment. 
    Apr 22 07:08 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Chevron Is Dead Money [View article]
    >>>Tortoise first bought 100 shares of Std. Oil of California for $4,400 in March 1970. After four 2 for one stock splits, we own 1600 shares. The current annual dividend is $6,400.
    Our cost per share is $2.75.<<<

    Tortoise #1,

    Wow! Earning $6,400 in dividends on a $4,400 investment. That is a beautiful and inspiring dividend growth example.
    Apr 19 07:55 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My KISS Dividend Portfolio: 1st Quarter 2014 Update [View article]
    carnegie,

    In addition to VIG & VYM also look at VEIPX, Vanguard Equity Income. It holds many of the dividend growth stocks you see mentioned on SA. I prefer individual dividend growth stocks but if I had to own mutual funds VEIPX would be it.
    Apr 19 07:05 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway, And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Brad,

    Your example to me illustrates the investing of folks that pay an adviser 1% or 2% of their portfolio per year to invest in index funds for them.
    Apr 18 12:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway, And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    >>>These 7 positions now total 64% of my 15 position portfolio.<<<

    Dividend Dynasty,

    Is that 64% of total retirement investments or 64% of a dividend growth portfolio? My top 7 are 12% of my total investments but 23% of my dividend growth portfolio. Because of restrictions in my 401k around 47% of my investments must be in funds. When I get to retirement most of this will be moved into dividend growth stocks with an emphasis on the highest quality.

    So my portfolio will become more concentrated. But I can still see me holding 50 to 60 or maybe even 70 companies. I would not be comfortable holding just 15.

    Having said that I do like your method of holding the financially strongest companies. For a concentrated portfolio I believe that is certainly the way to go.
    Apr 18 11:22 AM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway, And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    I guess quality and quantity (as in portfolio diversification or concentration) depends upon an investor's viewpoint. I have around 45 individual holdings and several mutual funds. And I consider my portfolio concentrated and the majority of my holdings are high quality . There are over 10,000 companies you can invest in. VT (Vanguard Total World) holds 6071 companies. I don't have enough confidence in the information available to invest otherwise.
    Apr 17 11:25 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway, And Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    Briar,

    I pretty much agree with your comment. I guess what is concentrated or diversified depends much upon a person's viewpoint. No way would I have 7% in one individual holding. My largest individual holding is at 2.7%. My individual holdings plus my mutual funds total over 50. Some would say I am over diversified. But I don't think so. When comparing my portfolio to VT (Vanguard Total World) which holds 6071 companies my portfolio looks more than concentrated enough. So in that regard I also agree with your Charlie Munger quote. One purpose of my investing is to meet my goal of providing a reliable and growing income in retirement.
    Apr 16 11:43 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • My KISS Dividend Portfolio: 1st Quarter 2014 Update [View article]
    >>>but what is your advise to the average Joe on getting there in terms of portfolio value when your base and contributions are very limited?<<<

    Zendra,

    If you would like specific advice it would help if you would fill out your profile. I am going to assume you are young. Saving $500 a month at 8% for 40 years gets you over 1.5 mil.

    The important thing though is to just get started and invest regularly. When I started working in 1976 I made $2.50 an hour. That is about $5200 a year. I bought my first stock in 1978. Today 36 years later my portfolio is in the high 6 figures. With just average returns going forward I will surpass 1 mil before retirement (no inheritance). I have never made a high salary (a little less than median income), my wife was a stay at home mom and is now working part time. The house and cars are paid for. I pay my credit card off each month and get cash back (about $300 a year).

    Basically we have lived a little beneath our means. Invested 10% to 15% of my salary. Stayed out of debt except for home and auto loans. Took advantage of 401k's and IRA's. And it has not been all work and no play. After investing we spend the rest of course. Take vacations every year. Been to Disney World six times, took four cruises and lots of little 3 to 4 day get a ways.

    For the investing part, learn all you can. If you like researching and learning about individual companies then invest that way. Select high quality, financially strong companies. If you don't like that then go with low cost mutual funds or ETFs from Vanguard or Fidelity.

    The main thing is to start and to be disciplined enough to stay with it though the highs and lows of the market.

    Good luck to you.
    Apr 16 10:23 PM | 15 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Challengers: 15 Increases Expected In The Next 11 Weeks [View article]
    Mike,

    Any early thoughts on BAX's decision to split the company into a Medical Products business and a Biopharmaceuticals business? Appears this will take place in mid 2015. Need more details but my initial thinking is that I will likely hold both after the split.
    Apr 16 09:28 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
COMMENTS STATS
572 Comments
786 Likes