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DianeLee

DianeLee
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  • The President will tonight unveil the "American Jobs Act," a program that includes an extension of payroll tax breaks, funds for infrastructure spending, and aid for long-term unemployed, according to leaked documents. The plan will be paid for by closing of corporate loopholes and higher taxes on the wealthy.  [View news story]
    "BlameBush...BlameBush... Offer something going forward, please.
    Sep 8, 2011. 02:56 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The President will tonight unveil the "American Jobs Act," a program that includes an extension of payroll tax breaks, funds for infrastructure spending, and aid for long-term unemployed, according to leaked documents. The plan will be paid for by closing of corporate loopholes and higher taxes on the wealthy.  [View news story]
    Same old BlameBush parroting. What do you have to offer going forward?
    Sep 8, 2011. 02:54 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The FHFA defends its lawsuits, saying Frannie's sophistication isn't the issue, it's bank misrepresentations. As for the suits potential to harm the economy, the agency wonders what kind of financial system we can have when investors can't trust securities issuers to follow the law. (pdf)  [View news story]
    It seems FHFA is both myopic and completely unaware of unintended consequences, while intent on easy money, suing and settling. If that's not the case...where have they been all this time?
    Sep 6, 2011. 11:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • In total, the FHFA has launched 17 suits against major banks that sold nearly $200B in MBS to the GSEs. No word yet on the value of the losses the agency is trying to recover. (PR) (individual filings)  [View news story]
    Regardless of how we arrived at this point, and bypassing all of the oversimplifications of argument, we can still be astounded that this Administration still has no concept whatever of unintended consequences.
    Sue the 17 largest banks? Well, that's where the money is. The incurious portion of the populace will jump on the Bash-the-Banks bandwagon, and it will be a political diversion of sorts in the ongoing BlameGame.
    However, could there be a worse time to destabilize the entire financial system of the United States, and for that matter the world? Is it careless and amateurish, or intentional, and for what purpose? Think.
    Sep 3, 2011. 08:07 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A worrisome indicator for stocks this fall: Typically thin August trading volume has been inordinately heavy during this month's market gyrations - heaviest on down days, and thinner when stocks have risen. "Fear is generating more volume on down days than skeptical optimism is generating on the up days," Instinet's John Schlitz says.  [View news story]
    Agree completely. SEC needs to step up with some regulations and controls, maybe high volume trade taxes. Investors at a decidedly unfair advantage while HFT scalps profits. Investors, who actually do offer liquidity, are picking up their marbles.
    Aug 26, 2011. 02:36 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Mike Krieger has a different take on Warren Buffett's (BRK.A) Bank of America (BAC +9.4%) investment: It's "extremely bearish for the market, the economy and the financial system." It shows BofA did indeed need capital, Krieger says, and that the Fed may be "out of the game. No one has confidence in the Fed to come save the day," so they went to the next best thing: "Uncle Warren."  [View news story]
    the opposite, of course, that our government is used as a socialist tool.
    Aug 25, 2011. 04:55 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple (AAPL) resumes trading, currently -6.5% at $352 AH.  [View news story]
    A truly great CEO like Jobs leaves a great network, great people, great products and the science to continue growth of products in place. Believe in him a little.
    Aug 24, 2011. 07:20 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Today's fluctuating stock action is a struggle to decide "how much credibility to give the durable goods orders," Art Cashin says. The data "don’t fit in. The regional Fed data indicates a much weaker economy out there than what the durable goods [data] indicate." He senses a "big surprise" from Bernanke this Friday by saying nothing, which "could catch the markets off base."  [View news story]
    Art Cashin is floor director for UBS and wise to shifts in the Market. Personally, I listen carefully to every word out of his mouth. My guess is that we are expecting far too much of Bernanke's statement on Friday, and they're attempting to let us down easy. Bernanke may have nothing to add, but he does not want a runaway Market on his watch. His last statement was to semi-guarantee no increase in interest rates for two years, and he may have a stabilizing comment Friday, without promising the moon. Traders expect too much sometimes. Try coming back to fundamentals, rather than knee-jerk minute-by-minute reaction to news.
    Aug 24, 2011. 02:54 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is High-Frequency Trading Causing Higher Volatility? [View article]
    Absolutely true, but think of the accumulative effect, then compare it to bumping downstairs, one step at a time.
    Aug 21, 2011. 07:32 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Is High-Frequency Trading Causing Higher Volatility? [View article]
    A further thought on how to avoid stock "in play" with HFT. Watch stock with high volume trade, then move on. (example: C before its 10-1 reverse split) Trade limits only. HFT is like playing chess with computers: very dangerous, and we're at strong disadvantages. HFT firms aren't in business to invest, they're in business to make money....yours.
    Aug 21, 2011. 07:07 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is High-Frequency Trading Causing Higher Volatility? [View article]
    Always suspicious of people who call other people "idiots" so let me ask you: do you think you're smarter than algorithms? Trust me. You're not.
    Aug 21, 2011. 07:00 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is High-Frequency Trading Causing Higher Volatility? [View article]
    HFT firms claim HFT adds liquidity. Considering the millions they are profiting on a daily basis, HFTs must be subtracting liquidity, more accurately. What might be the "net" number of trades? They're definitely deep into my personal candy jar. I've learned to avoid stock favored by daytraders, but how do we avoid HFT? Has the Market become a place for traders, moreso than investors? Oh, yes.
    Aug 21, 2011. 04:18 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Light volume likely signals the end of bargain hunting, so the market now faces a new dilemma: buyer exhaustion, Bob Pisani says. "If macro headlines continue to be light, the risk is to the downside because only a small group have shown any enthusiasm in buying a bottom. That group is likely done."  [View news story]
    *HFT. (sorry)
    Aug 17, 2011. 02:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Light volume likely signals the end of bargain hunting, so the market now faces a new dilemma: buyer exhaustion, Bob Pisani says. "If macro headlines continue to be light, the risk is to the downside because only a small group have shown any enthusiasm in buying a bottom. That group is likely done."  [View news story]
    Buyer fatigue could also have to do with true investors watching HFQ and algorithmic trading systematically strip away growth and profits. SEC? Hello? Anybody home, or are they all out barking up the wrong trees?
    Aug 17, 2011. 02:40 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • High frequency traders are likely to find themselves facing even greater scrutiny after this week's market turmoil. HFT volumes have exploded lately, asserts Wedbush Securities. "Some of their algorithms and automated systems are trading two, three or five times as many shares as they would have in a more normalized volatility environment.”  [View news story]
    "Liqidity providers"? HFTs DRAIN liquidity, only.
    Aug 12, 2011. 10:22 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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