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hjtheuns

hjtheuns
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ABT, AFL, CAG, CAT, CBRL, CL, CNP, COP, CVS, CVX, DE, GE, GILD, GIS, HAS, HDV, IBM, KMB, KO, KRFT, LEG, MCD, MDT, MKC, MRK, NKE, PFE, PG, PM, PSX, ROST, SPY, SYY, T, TEI, TGH, TIP, VFC, WAG, WFC, WMT, XOM
Latest comments  |  Highest rated
  • GE: In-Depth Analysis Of Share Repurchase And Dividends [View article]
    It isn't as productive for an investor to analyze where a stock has been as compared to where it is going. It is hard to be enamored with a stock when you are down 60%. Conversely, an investor who is up 200% shouldn't blindly love a stock. As far a Immelt is concerned, he took over GE when it had a PE of about 60 and therefore the stock had no where to go but down. IMO, GE is a sound investment going forward.
    Apr 18, 2013. 06:47 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Riding Dividend Growth Stocks Over The Fiscal Cliff [View article]
    Instead of spending $1.5 million to fly to Hawaii for two days he should have stayed in Washington to clean up the mess he created. It is the message he is sending which is I don’t give a dam about spending your money!
    Dec 26, 2012. 01:00 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Riding Dividend Growth Stocks Over The Fiscal Cliff [View article]
    I guess we will get to the spending cuts after we pay for the cost of flying private 747s to and from Hawaii for the Obamas? This is truly a disgrace and the press doesn’t even mention it.
    Dec 26, 2012. 12:26 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Payers In The S&P 500 May Become More Scarce In 2013 [View article]
    "It only makes sense that the rich should pay their fair share of taxes,they can afford it the most."

    The top 1% make 17% of income and pay 23% of income taxes (ratio of 1.35). The top 10% make 33.5% of income and pay 45% of income taxes (ratio of 1.35). The top 20% make 51% of income and pay 68% of income taxes (ratio of 1.33). These are higher ratios than any other industrialized nation.

    How do you define "fair share"?
    Nov 14, 2012. 12:57 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • 5 Myths About Dividend Growth Investing [View article]
    DGI is a sound investment strategy because it helps fund the portfolio during the accumulation phase and eliminates, or at least reduces, the need to liquidate assets during the distribution phase of one’s life. This is true risk reduction.

    Not much is said about the estate planning benefits of DGI. What a wonderful gift to leave your heirs, a growing portfolio that requires no to minimal funding by them and a significant income stream for their use in retirement.
    Mar 11, 2012. 08:41 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Price Of Admission For Buy-And-Hold Investing [View article]
    Buy more!
    Jan 19, 2012. 08:15 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • General Electric: $30+ Price Target In Play... Here's Why [View article]
    Orders are placed through a contract that details the terms which include termination costs. The buyer can terminate but GE receives compensation, the terms of which are product and case specific. Historically, about half of the back orders are for jet engines which are typically very secure orders and are ordered years in advance.
    Feb 6, 2014. 08:40 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Peter Schiff Wrong About Wal-Mart? [View article]
    It is truly amazing, and troublesome, that this minimum wage debate is even discussed. How many potentially productive people must be demoralized by becoming totally dependent on government transfer programs and how many people must be entrapped as working poor before the liberals realize that their policies, masked as compassion, are destroying people’s lives and are causing the bifurcated society they proclaim to denounce? Big centralized government with price and wage control does not work. Free markets and equal opportunity does.
    Dec 25, 2013. 08:55 AM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Dividend Investors Should Get Ready To Load Up [View article]
    I’m anticipating a significant sell off tomorrow and into the New Year. Depending on the stock, I plan to start adding to positions on a decline of about 5% and buy again if the decline reaches 10%. My shopping list includes: CL, CLX, EMR, GE, GIS, GPC, JNJ, KO, PEP, PFE, PG, T, UTX and WMT.
    Dec 30, 2012. 12:43 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Election Outcome And The Rising Risk To Your Portfolio [View article]
    Is it not equally true that if Obama loses the far left stance of the Senate would be forced to come to the center? Also, the right doesn't lose more, as you say, if we go over the fiscal cliff - we all lose. Is it not also fair to say that Romney has demonstrated an ability to compromise much more than Obama has?
    Nov 2, 2012. 10:05 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Obama Trying To Kill Dividend Investing? [View article]
    It is clear that what Obama is doing is positioning the political debate. He proposes that taxes be raised on the rich, knowing the Republicans will protest and the Senate won’t act. So when the Bush Tax Cuts are not extended, hurting more than just the rich, he can blame it on the Republicans. If you look at the public record, you will see that Obama doesn’t want to extend the Bush Tax Cuts for anyone, but doesn’t want to take the heat for hurting the middle class.
    Mar 7, 2012. 01:12 PM | 7 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Why Aren't The Dividend Aristocrats And Dividend Champions The Same? [View article]
    I believe this is an accurate list of Dividend Aristocrats in 2005:

    Abbott Labs
    Archer-Daniels-Midland
    Automatic Data Processing Inc.
    AmSouth Bancorporation
    ALLTEL Corp.
    Avery Dennison Corp.
    Bank of America Corp.
    Bard (C.R.) Inc.
    Becton, Dickinson
    Anheuser-Busch
    ConAgra Foods, Inc.
    Chubb Corp.
    Clorox Co.
    Comerica Inc.
    Century Telephone
    Dover Corp.
    Consolidated Edison
    Emerson Electric
    Family Dollar Stores
    First Horizon National
    Gannett Co.
    General Electric
    Grainger (W.W.) Inc.
    Johnson Controls
    Johnson & Johnson
    Jefferson-Pilot
    KeyCorp
    Kimberly-Clark
    Coca Cola Co.
    Leggett & Platt
    Lilly (Eli) & Co.
    Lowe’s Cos.
    May Dept. Stores
    McDonald’s Corp.
    McGraw-Hill
    3M Company
    Altria Group, Inc.
    Merck & Co.
    Nucor Corp.
    PepsiCo Inc.
    Pfizer, Inc.
    Procter & Gamble
    Progressive Corp.
    PPG Industries
    Regions Financial Corp.
    Rohm & Haas
    Donnelley (R.R.) & Sons
    Sherwin-Williams
    Sigma-Aldrich
    State Street Corp.
    Supervalu Inc.
    Stanley Works
    Target Corp.
    U.S. Bancorp
    V.F. Corp.
    Walgreen Co.
    Wal-Mart Stores

    Best of luck with your research.
    Mar 30, 2014. 09:24 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Requiem For Fallen Dividend Aristocrats [View article]
    Rico59 – You are absolutely correct that recent past and current factors have favored DGI and have led to the popularity of SA. It is clear that dividend-paying stocks possess the attributes many investors sought after the volatile and uncertain market brought on by the financial crisis. The ability to generate income in a low yield environment, the favorable tax treatment, the inflation hedge from dividend growth potential, the volatility buffer, the significant contribution to total return and the correlation to capital appreciation potential have all been widely praised by DGI enthusiasts here on SA. Some of these positive characteristics are more relevant to the current environment while others are more enduring. Therefore, I would take exception to an assertion that DGI is a fad that will soon fade. Focusing on companies that not only have preserved, but also raised their dividend on a regular basis is a proven method to identify industry leading companies with financial strength and strong growth prospects in structurally attractive industries. There are other investment approaches and DGI will not suit everyone, but it is a time-tested investment philosophy that will endure changes in the investment landscape.
    Mar 30, 2014. 11:15 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Rising Risks For Dividend Growth Investors [View article]
    DVK – This is what I have found looking into this today. I’ll look forward to your article.

    In 2013 PBI was removed.
    In 2012 CTL was removed.
    In 2011 LLY, SVU and TEG were removed.
    In 2010 AVY, BBT, GCI, GE, JCI, LM, MTB, PFE, STT and USB were removed.
    In 2009 BUD, BAC, CMA, FITB, KEY, NUE, PGR, RF and WWY were removed.

    This information is not official from S&P but comes from articles identified in a google search for dividend aristocrats list 20XX. I didn’t find any information about removals from the DA list for 2008 and prior.
    Mar 29, 2014. 07:59 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Can Dividend Growth Stocks Beat Inflation When Held In A Taxable Account? [View article]
    SDS - I look at the analysis differently. I prefer to track the progress of a dollar invested in DG stocks over a reasonably long period of time. Let’s use your average tax rate of 33% and average inflation rate of 3.4%. Instead of your DGR assumption of 6.6% I will use 10% as this closely matches my experience over the past decade. I’ll also assume that this dollar we will track is invested in a DG stock that is yielding 3% at the time of purchase and we hold it for 10 years. To reduce rounding error we’ll start with an investment of $1,000.

    Year 1: The $30.00 dividend provides $19.08 after tax and inflation.
    Year 2: The $33.00 dividend provides $20.99 after tax and inflation.
    Year 3: The $36.30 dividend provides $23.09 after tax and inflation.
    Year 4: The $39.93 dividend provides $25.40 after tax and inflation.
    Year 5: The $43.92 dividend provides $27.94 after tax and inflation.
    Year 6: The $48.32 dividend provides $30.73 after tax and inflation.
    Year 7: The $53.15 dividend provides $33.80 after tax and inflation.
    Year 8: The $58.46 dividend provides $37.18 after tax and inflation.
    Year 9: The $64.31 dividend provides $40.90 after tax and inflation.
    Year 10: The $70.74 dividend provides $44.99 after tax and inflation.

    So this simple model shows that the DGI is 1.91% ahead of taxes and inflation the first year and is 4.50% ahead after a decade. DGI works well even in a taxable account!
    Nov 9, 2012. 08:23 AM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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