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  • How To Define Risk In Dividend-Paying Stocks [View article]
    george,

    Let me guess how you do this. Start with the combined sheet, remove all header and trailer rows, then use SQL statements or the Access equivalent. Am I close?
    Aug 13 07:31 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Musk outlines Hyperloop; Tesla wants to remove side mirrors [View news story]
    Imagine what would happen when the San Andreas fault moves under the tube while it is in use. Ugly.
    Aug 13 01:22 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • mREITs: An Opportunity To Be Greedy When Others Are Fearful [View article]
    The crash in NLY was in 2004-2005, not 2008-2009. The slope of the yield curve stayed positive throughout that time, but went negative in 2006. The price drop in 2005-2005 anticipated this, but when the slope actually went negative, the NLY price went up, anticipating a reversion to a positive yield curve slope that shortly followed.

    The lessons I have drawn from NLY are that 1) a positive yield curve is the source of mREIT dividends, 2) even a mildly negative slope will not completely destroy dividends if proper hedging is used, 3) mREIT dividends are high because they are variable, and 4) mREIT dividends can not be depended upon to grow regularly.
    Aug 12 03:15 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • A Closer Look At Enterprise Products Partners' Distributable Cash Flow As Of Q2 2013 [View article]
    I agree that over a longer time span than 1 year, EPD has clearly been the better investment for total return.
    Aug 12 03:01 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • mREITs: An Opportunity To Be Greedy When Others Are Fearful [View article]
    Akaralph,

    I checked the returns on NLY for the years 2008-2009 using F.A.S.T. Graphs, and what I see is very different from what you see.

    Without dividend reinvestment, annualized ROR is 15.9%, and with reinvestment is 16.9%. The same numbers for S&P 500 are -17.7% and -18.4%.

    longrundata reports 12.85% annualized ROR for the same time period.
    Aug 12 02:55 PM | 6 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • mREITs: An Opportunity To Be Greedy When Others Are Fearful [View article]
    I agree with your thesis on balance and decided to risk it by investing 0.1% of my capital in MORL.
    Aug 12 01:41 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • HCP, Inc: A Healthcare REIT For My Dividend Growth Machine [View article]
    I can think of only two reasons for the discrepancies:

    1) Logic error. This would be the cause if the logic were looking at the wrong date, i.e. ex-div date rather than payment date. However, if this were the case, you would expect to see it happen consistently, and it does not. Therefore, the reason is most likely...

    2) Data error, which presumably is not something that FAST Graphs can control. For just this reason, my advice is to always double-check dividend numbers with a company's web site.
    Aug 12 01:11 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • A Closer Look At Enterprise Products Partners' Distributable Cash Flow As Of Q2 2013 [View article]
    That is not what I see: http://on.mktw.net/19n...
    Aug 12 12:33 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Linn Energy Acknowledges Production And Cash Flow Issues, But Reaffirms Dividend Rate [View article]
    I am pretty much in the same boat.
    Aug 12 12:30 PM | 5 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • HCP, Inc: A Healthcare REIT For My Dividend Growth Machine [View article]
    I used 10 years. If I were actively considering investing in HCP I would use a range of years, as you have done, since longer time periods do not normally represent the recent past accurately.

    I have also seen instances where FAST Graphs reported incorrect dividend cuts. Because of this, I always verify dividend information by going directly to the company web site. I did not do so in this case.
    Aug 12 11:00 AM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • HCP, Inc: A Healthcare REIT For My Dividend Growth Machine [View article]
    When I look at HCP with F.A.S.T. Graphs, I see something very different.

    Current P/FFO = 18.3, normal P/FFO = 14.8. Seriously over valued.

    10 year FFO CAGR is 2.05%.

    FFO in 2006 was zero, in 2007 was $0.09/shr. FFO payout ratio was not meaningful in 2006, 2023% in 2007, 125% in 2009, 119% in 2010.

    10 year CAGR of both ROI and ROE are negative.

    But that is all in the past. We invest for the future. 5 Capital IQ analysts forecast 4% FFO growth for each of the next 5 years. This is more encouraging, but will these turn out to be a break from the past?
    Aug 11 08:13 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • What's next for MLPs? [View news story]
    Rail is more flexible, can reach more places. Pipelines are cheaper. It depends on the situation.
    Aug 11 12:26 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • The Interpretation Of The Earnings And Price Correlated F.A.S.T. Graphs™ Made Simple [View instapost]
    There is another very important metric that I always use to analyze dividend sustainability: Free Cash Flow (FCF). The F.A.S.T. Graphs definition of FCF is Operating Activities - Net Cash Flow minus Cash Dividends minus Capital Expenditures. If the FCF area (orange) is above the X axis, then dividends are paid from FCF, which is what you want to see. If the FCF area does not appear (i.e. would be negative), dividends are not paid from FCF but rather from either added debt or added shares, but in either case this a warning.

    f you select F.U.N. Graphs, you can see negative FCF in the Per Share Cash Flow Graph.
    Aug 11 11:54 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • The Interpretation Of The Earnings And Price Correlated F.A.S.T. Graphs™ Made Simple [View instapost]
    There is another very important metric that I always use to analyze dividend sustainability: Free Cash Flow (FCF). The F.A.S.T. Graphs definition of FCF is Operating Activities - Net Cash Flow minus Cash Dividends minus Capital Expenditures. If the FCF area (orange) is above the X axis, then dividends are paid from FCF, which is what you want to see. If the FCF area does not appear (i.e. would be negative), dividends are not paid from FCF but rather from either added debt or added shares, but in either case this a warning.

    If you select F.U.N. Graphs, you can see negative FCF in the Per Share Cash Flow Graph.
    Aug 9 11:08 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Pitney Bowes 10% July Upside Paced Dividend Achievers 50 Index [View article]
    How is it that PBI is still in the Dividend Achievers' Index even though it reduced its dividend. Makes me wonder what good the index is. Needless to say, from how on I will ignore it.
    Aug 9 02:35 AM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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