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sean.parmelee

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  • Apple (AAPL): FQ4 EPS of $8.67 misses by $0.08. Revenue of $36B (+27% Y/Y) beats by $200M. 26.9M iPhones sold, 14M iPads, 5.3M iPods. Shares halted. (PR[View news story]
    What percent did the guidance miss by, John?
    Oct 25, 2012. 04:55 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple (AAPL): FQ4 EPS of $8.67 misses by $0.08. Revenue of $36B (+27% Y/Y) beats by $200M. 26.9M iPhones sold, 14M iPads, 5.3M iPods. Shares halted. (PR[View news story]
    You need to recalibrate your sarcasm detector.
    Oct 25, 2012. 04:47 PM | 30 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple (AAPL): FQ4 EPS of $8.67 misses by $0.08. Revenue of $36B (+27% Y/Y) beats by $200M. 26.9M iPhones sold, 14M iPads, 5.3M iPods. Shares halted. (PR[View news story]
    Here come the AAPL apologists turning a small miss into a beat.
    Oct 25, 2012. 04:46 PM | 9 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple (AAPL): FQ4 EPS of $8.67 misses by $0.08. Revenue of $36B (+27% Y/Y) beats by $200M. 26.9M iPhones sold, 14M iPads, 5.3M iPods. Shares halted. (PR[View news story]
    AAPL officially out of business for good
    Oct 25, 2012. 04:39 PM | 16 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Investors seem nervous ahead of Apple's (AAPL -1%) FQ4 report. Not only is Apple trading lower, so are component suppliers Cirrus Logic (CRUS -4%), OmniVision (OVTI -2.2%), Broadcom (BRCM -2%), and SanDisk (SNDK -1.7%). Expectations definitely aren't where they were on Sep. 21, the day the iPhone 5 launched and Apple made its all-time high. (earlier[View news story]
    http://seekingalpha.co...
    Oct 25, 2012. 03:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft (MSFT) officially launches Windows 8 at an NYC event (live blog) that's light on new details. More importantly, a flurry of Windows 8 reviews are out. Like others, David Pogue isn't a fan of Microsoft's efforts to fuse two UIs: "TileWorld is fantastic for touch screens ... Desktop Windows is obviously designed for the mouse ... you can’t live exclusively in one world or the other." The Verge has similar concerns, but is more positive about Win. 8's tablet potential. "Picking up a tablet PC with Windows 8 makes an iPad feel immediately out of date." (more[View news story]
    HH,

    I think you're right on all counts.
    Oct 25, 2012. 03:29 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft (MSFT) officially launches Windows 8 at an NYC event (live blog) that's light on new details. More importantly, a flurry of Windows 8 reviews are out. Like others, David Pogue isn't a fan of Microsoft's efforts to fuse two UIs: "TileWorld is fantastic for touch screens ... Desktop Windows is obviously designed for the mouse ... you can’t live exclusively in one world or the other." The Verge has similar concerns, but is more positive about Win. 8's tablet potential. "Picking up a tablet PC with Windows 8 makes an iPad feel immediately out of date." (more[View news story]
    Office is not the entirety of enterprise productivity, although it's worth mentioning that the inclusion of Office with the Surface must be considered when comparing its price to other devices' price. Moreover, I find it baffling that some people are simultaneously claiming that businesses will switch to iPads and force a totally unusable-for-enterprise device to work at the drop of a hat, but will not make minor adjustments to move to a newer Windows version. If I were an IT manager and I was under pressure to implement a tablet solution, I would be far more comfortable upgrading to Win 8 than switching to iOS. The iPad can't even print without a special app. No USB jump drives. iPad is dead in the water for most businessmen.
    Oct 25, 2012. 02:43 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft (MSFT) officially launches Windows 8 at an NYC event (live blog) that's light on new details. More importantly, a flurry of Windows 8 reviews are out. Like others, David Pogue isn't a fan of Microsoft's efforts to fuse two UIs: "TileWorld is fantastic for touch screens ... Desktop Windows is obviously designed for the mouse ... you can’t live exclusively in one world or the other." The Verge has similar concerns, but is more positive about Win. 8's tablet potential. "Picking up a tablet PC with Windows 8 makes an iPad feel immediately out of date." (more[View news story]
    You're contradicted by the early reviews. "Come for the hardware, tolerate the software." Hardware is extremely positive in reviews, and people have used it on their laps just fine. And I think you hugely underestimate the appeal of the Surface Pro as a be-all-end-all device for enterprise customers, say, salesmen who split their time between the office and the road.
    Oct 25, 2012. 02:09 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft (MSFT) officially launches Windows 8 at an NYC event (live blog) that's light on new details. More importantly, a flurry of Windows 8 reviews are out. Like others, David Pogue isn't a fan of Microsoft's efforts to fuse two UIs: "TileWorld is fantastic for touch screens ... Desktop Windows is obviously designed for the mouse ... you can’t live exclusively in one world or the other." The Verge has similar concerns, but is more positive about Win. 8's tablet potential. "Picking up a tablet PC with Windows 8 makes an iPad feel immediately out of date." (more[View news story]
    Samir,

    While it is true that you can switch to desktop mode for some tasks, the start menu has been completely eliminated. That tile screen IS the start menu. Like many things on the computer, people who are very particular about the way they want to accomplish common tasks will simply need to do a lot of work arranging the tiles on that screen in a way that makes them happy. In desktop mode, they can also add a Quick Launch toolbar to the taskbar.
    Oct 25, 2012. 01:24 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft (MSFT) officially launches Windows 8 at an NYC event (live blog) that's light on new details. More importantly, a flurry of Windows 8 reviews are out. Like others, David Pogue isn't a fan of Microsoft's efforts to fuse two UIs: "TileWorld is fantastic for touch screens ... Desktop Windows is obviously designed for the mouse ... you can’t live exclusively in one world or the other." The Verge has similar concerns, but is more positive about Win. 8's tablet potential. "Picking up a tablet PC with Windows 8 makes an iPad feel immediately out of date." (more[View news story]
    I used Win 8 for a few weeks and I can confirm that it is significantly faster across the board than Win 7 (running apps, startup, you name it), which was already widely praised for its speed.

    I would also disagree with the assertion that because it has been optimized for touch, desktop users are getting the shaft. It took time to get used to the new ways of navigating the operating system, but there were very few things that were really annoying on my desktop PC.
    Oct 25, 2012. 01:04 PM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Is Coca-Cola 'Too Big To Grow' Now? [View article]
    Jacob,

    How do the "throwback" sodas, which use white sugar, fit into Pepsi or Coke's business model? When I first saw these in stores I assumed they would be short-lived promotional items, but here they are, what, five or six years later?
    Oct 17, 2012. 04:46 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • September Nonfarm Payrolls: +114K vs. consensus +115K, +142K previous (revised from 96K). Unemployment rate 7.8% vs. consensus 8.2%, 8.1% previous. [View news story]
    kmi,

    Agreed that McCain was a terrible candidate and deserved to lose.

    I've already answered your question about how Obama has engendered socialism in America. His biggest failure as a president has been his total unwillingness to reduce spending in any meaningful way. It's to the point that I genuinely believe that Obama does not consider federal spending at 23% of GDP to be a problem, and that the only thing the federal budget really needs at this point is more tax revenue. By crowding out the private economy, Obama is slowly but surely pushing us down the path to European-style soft socialism, where half of GDP is government spending on social programs and the vast majority of the population receives some form of welfare services.

    As another specific example, consider the case of college tuition. Everyone knows that college tuition is exploding, year after year, despite no matching explosion in the quality of education. This money is going into a black hole of bloated compensation packages, bureaucracy, and fancy new buildings and classroom equipment. Even the part-time jobs the universities offer to students have absurd compensation--$10/hour for the kid who swipes meal cards in dining halls is perfectly normal. To pay for it all, most students now attending universities in the U.S. are receiving federal student loans for the majority of their tuition costs. College tuition is exploding because these students are told that their loans are not a big deal, that they don't have to pay them off for a long time (and may never have to, since student loan forgiveness is a topic that never seems to go away), and that everyone needs a four-year liberal arts degree from a prestigious university to succeed in the working world. As with healthcare--where people with employer-sponsored insurance have no idea how much the services they're receiving cost--these students have no idea whether the education they're receiving is a good value or not, compared to community colleges, to splitting two years at a community college and two years at a four-year university, to not going to college at all, or to going to a different college. Kids (and their parents) just pick a school they like and take out a loan for it. Where I'm going with all of this is that there's no real college education market (just as there's no real health care market) because most people in it are, however temporarily, having someone else foot the bill. Obama's solution to this has been to say that the lenders are the problem, and nationalized the student loan business so that he could write more loans. Let's be honest, if it were up to him, there would be a guaranteed college education for everyone. (On the healthcare front, Obama demagogues the idea of eliminating tax breaks for employer-sponsored health insurance. ObamaCare also basically eliminated the concept of high-deductible health savings account-type insurance, which also encourages people to become aware of the costs of health services. And of course Obama completely rejects the Medicare Advantage model.) On every issue involving exploding costs--federal social programs like Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security; college tuition; private health insurance--Obama's approach has been to say, "Even though there is no market, the market has failed. The private corporations involved are to blame. Therefore, I would like to put those corporations out of business and provide their services to everyone for free." Still looking for specific examples? How about the illegal and unnecessary government takeover of GM? An orderly bankruptcy proceeding would have sufficed there, but Obama preferred to use his "false choice" rhetoric, proclaiming that the choice was either to nationalize GM or to liquidate the entire apparatus. How about the stimulus itself, which rather than stimulate anything in the private sector, went largely to bail out irresponsible state governments so that huge unionized worker compensation structures would not have to be re-negotiated. As Romney has repeatedly pointed out, Obama believes that the solution to all of America's problems is government. Or, as the Democrats in Charlotte put it, "Government is the only thing we all belong to." The socialist utopia is a society where the space between the government and the individual--which for the great bulk of American history has been filled by the family, the community, private enterprises, religious groups, etc.--is made as small as possible. Hence "The Life of Julia." I could go on like this forever, but I think more is probably less at this point.
    Oct 5, 2012. 05:53 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • September Nonfarm Payrolls: +114K vs. consensus +115K, +142K previous (revised from 96K). Unemployment rate 7.8% vs. consensus 8.2%, 8.1% previous. [View news story]
    kmi, apologies if I came across as confrontational. That wasn't my intent. With that said, asking a series of pointed questions implicitly involves making an argument. In all three of your questions, the implicit argument I read seemed to involve the "false choice" fallacy that Obama is fond of using in his stump speeches.

    I don't find Romney's "leave it up to the states" argument to be a bad one, considering the unconstitutionality of the ACA is irrelevant on a state level, where governments explicitly have plenary powers. The only real issue is why he decided to pursue an ACA-style policy as governor. I have no idea. He said in the debate that he likes it.

    As I've made clear, I don't think the notion of "fundamentally altering the country" (an argument which is made by both parties, by the way) is helpful or accurate. It is a continuum, and the issue is how far to the left or right we as a nation want to be. You and I may dislike the rhetoric that's been used, but I wholeheartedly support the continued gridlock in Washington and extended debate about the role of government that it entails. It's a good thing.

    To answer your question of how Obama has pushed the needle in favor of socialism is very simple: all you have to do is look at what percentage of GDP he would like to be devoted to government social services. If a 100% socialist society would spend 100% of GDP on social services, because the government controls 100% of the means of production, then the % of GDP spent by the federal government on social services in a mixed economy is a very rough measure of how far to the left or right we lie on that continuum we've discussed. It is plain as day that Obama's solution to chronic deficits is increased taxes, to make permanent current levels of spending. (His oft-repeated "$1 of new taxes for every $2.5 of spending cuts" is a farce and is more like $10 of new taxes for every $1 of spending cuts, when the budgetary gimmicks are stripped out.) It is equally clear that Romney's (and in particular, Ryan's) solution is decreased spending. (I should also point out that only a fool can't figure out that Romney intends to eliminate or restrict a number of popular tax deductions, including mortgage interest. He's not stupid enough to come out and say it, because Democrats' demagoguery and fear-mongering on this issue has blinded most people to the necessity of reform.) The feasibility of either man's proposal is irrelevant: one man wants current spending levels to continue or even accelerate, while the other wants to restore historical spending levels.
    Oct 5, 2012. 01:56 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • September Nonfarm Payrolls: +114K vs. consensus +115K, +142K previous (revised from 96K). Unemployment rate 7.8% vs. consensus 8.2%, 8.1% previous. [View news story]
    The percentage of civilians over age 65 who are retired has been dropping steadily for the last several years. This value was 83.5% in June of 2008 and is 81.4% now. So the claim that baby boomers retiring in large numbers is driving down the labor force participation rate is simply inaccurate. There are more people working past 65 now than there were when the participation rate was 3% higher, because the pace of new retirees is slower than the pace of people who still work turning 65.

    The reality is likely the exact opposite of the "boomers" argument: older workers are postponing retirement to try to regain the losses they sustained to their 401(k)s and property values, preventing younger employees from finding work. Moreover, because older workers command higher wages, this decreases the number of employees companies can hire, driving down employment among the entire population, not just the youngest cohort.
    Oct 5, 2012. 12:57 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • September Nonfarm Payrolls: +114K vs. consensus +115K, +142K previous (revised from 96K). Unemployment rate 7.8% vs. consensus 8.2%, 8.1% previous. [View news story]
    kmi,

    All three of your arguments are classic examples of false-choice fallacies. 2MuchDebt and I have clearly explained how real economies are always mixed economies, wherein the degree to which socialism has creeped in is variable. This is what the real debate is about. The choice is not between social safety nets or nothing, nor between regulations or nothing, nor between the old status quo or ObamaCare. Such is exactly the campaign rhetoric of Democrats this election season: voters must choose between our regulations and another financial crisis, between our regulations and dirty air and water, between our social programs and throwing the poor, elderly, and disabled to the wolves, et cetera, ad nauseum.

    The real reason these debates and broader political system have become so poisonous lately is because of absurd mischaracterizations of the other party's policy proposals. If you declare loudly and repeatedly to the American people that there is no common ground between you and your opponents, you just might create a reality in which that is true. Case in point: http://usat.ly/VFoJHA
    Oct 5, 2012. 12:44 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
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