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creeper74

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  • Amazon: Fire Phone Is A Flop [View article]
    Respectfully disagree with your assessment. Amazon has just put their entire store in the hands of the consumer on THEIR terms, not in an app that has to abide by iTunes App Store or Google App Store policies. Everything they do is to push eyeballs to their store, and this phone will do the same thing. I don't think they're in this to sell phones (as an HTC, Samsung, or Nokia would be) as much as to hook more people into the Amazon way...which is why we aren't seeing it priced lower.

    As for the ATT partnership, which other carrier could they have worked with? The cost of phone requires a carrier subsidy if it's to have a chance on the market because that $650 for last year's specs is untenable. In the context of coverage maps, it's ATT and Verizon. For as much flak as they're getting for partnering with ATT, offering this on Verizon instead would result in the phone being absolutely stillborn.

    Whether there is a even a market for someone who is so married to the Amazon ecosystem that they would choose a phone like this and eschew many of the benefits of an Android phone is, like the technical inaccuracies in this article, a subject for another discussion. Amazon has the resources to iterate on this at least a couple of times (I would guess) before throwing in the towel, and I'm not sure there's a company better at turning user feedback into polished features, so I wouldn't be too quick to dismiss this before seeing Gen 2.
    Jun 24 05:09 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • What WWDC Says About Apple's New Products [View article]
    Interesting insight on the iWatch, especially with regards to the iPod nano. Do you think that instead of an actual watch, we'll instead see a revamp of the nano to include biometric sensors? The nano in its most current form factor seems to overlap with a watch in too many ways. I have a nano and the watchband adapter for it that allows you to wear it as a watch. Seems like a safer way to enter the wearables fray. ..
    Jun 3 05:22 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Apple Should Buy Out Comcast [View article]
    I mostly agree with your assessment, with the exception that even IF cable TV is dying at the hand of streaming, those pipes that cordcutters are riding on come from the cable companies anyway. We may be talking about the difference between a dollar bill and ten dimes, since it's going to end up in the coffers of the same provider.
    Apr 7 05:04 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "It is time to break up Google (GOOG)," writes Richard Sennett of the London School of Economics. "The problem is simple: the company is just too powerful, as are Apple (AAPL) and many other big tech groups." Sennett harks back to when the Supreme Court broke up Standard Oil in 1911, when "an overmighty business was shattered into 33 shards." He also cites the progressives of a century ago, such as Herbery Croly, who believed that successful start-ups would extinguish competition and become monopolies. Breaking them up "would set talent free." [View news story]
    Fair enough, but my comment about the thinness was addressing the 30-pin connector since Apple is not going to put a standard connector in their phone. It wouldn't allow them to QC the accessories for the iDevices.
    Jul 1 06:11 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "It is time to break up Google (GOOG)," writes Richard Sennett of the London School of Economics. "The problem is simple: the company is just too powerful, as are Apple (AAPL) and many other big tech groups." Sennett harks back to when the Supreme Court broke up Standard Oil in 1911, when "an overmighty business was shattered into 33 shards." He also cites the progressives of a century ago, such as Herbery Croly, who believed that successful start-ups would extinguish competition and become monopolies. Breaking them up "would set talent free." [View news story]
    Open interfaces may benefit users, but they don't benefit consumers or shareholders. You brought up the Lightning cable in your earlier post, so let's use that as our example. Apple is more protective of its user experience than other companies, and to that end, they created the "Made for iOS" standard that third-party manufacturers must abide by in order to market sanctioned accessories. I don't agree with the added cost that participating in this program requires, but it is what it is. If Apple were to use an industry standard interface like MicroUSB, they'd lose the ability to control the quality of accessories for their products...hence, the 30-pin connector.

    The Lightning cable was borne out of their desire to make the iPhone thinner, and the internal components of the 30-pin was getting in the way of that. The higher cost of the cable ($30 for a cable to connect your phone/tablet is pretty tough to swallow) is attributed to the processors that each cable contain within the connectors that might serve as some sort of authentication as some have speculated, but definitely facilitate the ability to connect the cable in either orientation.

    EDIT (I cut off my entire last paragraph): You wouldn't have a phone as thin with the build quality of the iPhone 5 in the absence of the Lightning connector, and the Lightning cable would never come to be in a world of only open standards.
    Jun 30 03:18 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • "It is time to break up Google (GOOG)," writes Richard Sennett of the London School of Economics. "The problem is simple: the company is just too powerful, as are Apple (AAPL) and many other big tech groups." Sennett harks back to when the Supreme Court broke up Standard Oil in 1911, when "an overmighty business was shattered into 33 shards." He also cites the progressives of a century ago, such as Herbery Croly, who believed that successful start-ups would extinguish competition and become monopolies. Breaking them up "would set talent free." [View news story]
    @D_Virginia

    The idea that Apple has a "near monopoly" on anything is ludicrous.
    They hold less than ten percent of the traditional PC market, and their global mobile device market share is dwarfed by Android. Where exactly is this "monopoly"?

    Sure, their walled garden is prohibitive, but consumers are CHOOSING to enter the garden. It's the synergy between their products that makes them so attractive. They've found the nexus of hardware design, software design, and customer service, become one of the most valuable companies in the world despite not being the leader in any market they participate in, and our response is to call them a monopoly and break them up? Please. The only things Apple has a monopoly on is Apple products and consumer mindshare.

    But to compare Apple and Google to Standard Oil? Oy. Beyond being two of the biggest tech companies, they're also two of the biggest R&D companies. They aren't just producing, they're innovating. Break those two up, and who steps in to fill that space? A foreign company like Samsung whom our government would have little to no influence over?
    Jun 30 02:43 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Intel Can Give Apple The Edge In Mobile [View article]
    Sorry, you're off base here. Apple is more interested in preserving margins than market share. The A(n) chip series has been optimized for iOS (and vice versa), and spec pissing contests just aren't as prevalent in the mobile space as they were in the desktop computing space.

    I don't mean to dismiss Intel altogether, because they could show Apple something they like and then all bets are off. But as it stands right now, the title of the article should be "Apple can give Intel the Edge in Mobile".
    May 18 03:53 AM | 8 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft And The Windows 8 Conundrum [View article]
    Most of those run a variant of Windows (Windows CE) that isn't a fullblown desktop version that we know and love. It is it's own release with a unique kernel. Therefore, it's not subject to the upgrade cycle of tradtional Windows releases. It primary purpose is to provide a stable and secure environment for device manufacturers to run their software on top of.

    I know, "stable" and "secure" aren't words usually associated with Windows, but you'd be surprised how those two things improve when you remove 90% of the UI bells and whistles of the traditional OS.
    Apr 12 09:56 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Comcast Buys NBC Universal: Good Or Bad? [View article]
    You have some valid points, but I wouldn't have used the Google fiber project as a evidence to argue against Comcast's broadband pricing. That project is a proof-of-concept in a single city, to show what having a pipe that large could do for businesses.

    Truth is, they learned what everyone else probably already knew: your connection is only as fast as the one on the other end. Most broadband plans are in the 10-20 mb range, and it's difficult to saturate even that. To truly push innovation, ISPs should figure out how to provide more upstream bandwidth. Giving a 20mb download speed while upload tops out around 1mb is shameful. And yes, I know that the upstream limitation is more technical than market driven, but I'm just pointing out where I think Comcast (as an ISP) could distinguish themselves.
    Feb 13 07:02 PM | Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Microsoft: Surface Sales Don't Matter [View article]
    The reason Surface RT does matter is because customers are not going to buy the compute devices that MS traditionally dominates in the same numbers as before. Desktops and laptops have been replaced in large part by tablets and phones (outside of the enterprise, anyway), and the RT represents Microsoft's attempt to stay relevant to consumers.
    Dec 27 08:57 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Will Apple Sink On Tepid Response To iPhone 5? [View article]
    You need to read up before you start complaining, as answers to all of your complaints can be found on mainstream tech sites. They got rid of GMaps because of the acrimonious nature of the Apple/Google relationship. Mapping is such a huge piece of any smartphone, they weren't comfortable with trusting it to a third-party (and their main competitor in the phone space, no less).

    For all the NFC chips in Android phones, support for the technology in the retail space could generously be called "sparse". Apple isn't usually a hardware innovator, they're an experience innovator. They don't normally like to be at the front of a hardware trend, and the iphone commands such a large part of the market that they're fine with waiting to see what happens with NFC. Its absence is not going to discourage anyone from buying this phone. Not having NFC in the new iPhone hurts NFC more than it does Apple. Seriously.

    An Apple executive addressed the issue of wireless charging by saying (rightly) that a charging cable gives you more options to find a charge. You could charge from a wall, your PC, your car. That's not possible right now with Qi. And the 30-pin needed to get smaller to enable them to make the phone smaller.

    Agreed that it isn't as eye-popping as it used to be, and the UI is long overdue for an update. But, it's mature, and when you sell tens of millions of units every year, you can't exactly turn on a dime. And they aren't about to fragment the OS like Google allows.
    Sep 21 10:23 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Will Apple Sink On Tepid Response To iPhone 5? [View article]
    $199 on contract. Much lower than $1000...and pretty close to perfect, depending on requirements.
    Sep 21 10:08 PM | 2 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Will Apple Sink On Tepid Response To iPhone 5? [View article]
    Somebody's trolling....

    This is 'Seinfeld' for investors. An article about nothing...
    Sep 21 05:28 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
  • Facebook Investors: Your Nightmare Has Just Begun [View article]
    ummm...no.

    The author is correct about the reason there are so many shares out there, and it's not because FB is about to drop something magnificent on the world. It's because they have bartered their way to this point by trading shares for services...which is a common practice, esp. in that corner of the world.

    I don't think they were trying to wow this guy when they paid with stock: http://nyti.ms/QtLPBs
    Jul 31 03:44 PM | 3 Likes Like |Link to Comment
  • Facebook Investors: Your Nightmare Has Just Begun [View article]
    @delfairchild I have to disagree with you there. In the context of ad space bought on FB, the clicked ones are how FB (and the advertiser) measure success (of the ad).

    While it's true that generating brand awareness is the ultimate goal, if I as a company can't reliably measure the performance of ads I paid to post on FB, then I'd look for a better return on my marketing dollar. If there are enough companies like me doing the same, that spells doom for them.
    Jul 31 03:34 PM | 1 Like Like |Link to Comment
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