Horizon Technology Finance Corporation's (HRZN) CEO Robert Pomeroy on Q1 2016 Results - Earnings Call Transcript

| About: Horizon Technology (HRZN)
This article is now exclusive for PRO subscribers.

Horizon Technology Finance Corporation (NASDAQ:HRZN) Q2 2016 Earnings Conference Call August 3, 2016 9:00 AM ET

Executives

Megan Bacon - IR

Robert Pomeroy - Chairman & CEO

Gerry Michaud - President

Chris Mathieu - CFO

Analysts

Ryan Lynch - KBW

Jonathan Bock - Wells Fargo

Casey Alexander - Compass Point Research

Christopher Testa - National Securities

Operator

Good morning, and welcome to Horizon Technology Finance's Second Quarter 2016 Conference Call. Today's call is being recorded. All lines have been placed on mute. We will conduct a question-and-answer session after the prepared remarks. Instructions will follow at that time.

I would now like to turn the call over to Megan Bacon of Horizon for introductions and the reading of the Safe Harbor statement. Please go ahead.

Megan Bacon

Thank you. And welcome to the Horizon Technology Finance second quarter 2016 conference call. Representing the company today are Rob Pomeroy, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; Gerry Michaud, President, and Chris Mathieu, Chief Financial Officer. Before we begin, I would like to point out that the Q2 press release is available on the company's website at horizontechfinance.com.

Now, I will read upon Safe Harbor statement. During this conference call, Horizon Technology Finance will make certain forward-looking statements, including statements with regard to the future performance of the company. Words such as believes, expects, anticipates, intends, or similar expressions are used to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are subject to the inherent uncertainties in predicting future results and conditions. Certain factors could cause actual results to differ on a material basis from those projected in these forward-looking statements. And some of these factors are detailed in the risk factor discussion in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the Company's Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015. The Company undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

At this time, I would like to turn the call over to Rob Pomeroy.

Robert Pomeroy

Good morning, and thank you all for joining us. Our second quarter was influenced by a variety of factors that produced mixed results. These results included strong net investment income which covered distributions for the fourth consecutive quarter but also included a decline in NAV, mainly attributable to one underperforming loan we originated this year. Before discussing our net investment income performance and the strong portfolio yield we generated which we believe demonstrates the overall strength and profitability of the Horizon platform, I would like to discuss our NAV.

During the second quarter, we saw a reduction in our NAV to $13.27 per share. The primary reason for this decline was a loan we made to NOMi which we wrote down in the second quarter. After we made the loan in January, the portfolio companies business suffered a series of unexpected challenges and negative events that quickly impacted its results and put its financial plans in jeopardy. Based on our review of the portfolio company's performance and prospects we took prompt action to seek the best possible outcome. The company's management, investors and lenders mutually agreed the best course of action was to liquidate the assets of the company. That process began in June with the sale of the company's hardware business and will continue during the second half of the year; accordingly, the balance of the loan was written down and put on non-accrual.

While negative outcomes occasionally happen in venture lending, it is rare to have a portfolio company become troubled and liquidate so quickly. Thus the outcome of this loan is very disappointing and needless to say we are not pleased. It is important to note that we believe this result is an outlier and based on our track record, we do not believe it signifies any systemic issues with our portfolio or our underwriting process. We believe our overall portfolio's credit quality remains strong as our internal rating migration during the second quarter was consistent with prior periods. Off note, nearly 22% of our loans at June 30 were rated 4 indicating performance better than expected. This is an increase over the first quarter of this year and the second quarter of 2015.

As of June 30, our loan portfolio had a weighted average internal credit rating of 3.1 and over 88% of our portfolio was performing as well or better than our expectations at the time of underwriting.

Now let's turn to investment activity and NII results. During the second quarter we continue to maintain a disciplined approach to investment selection with a focus on originating high quality attractively priced loans. With the demand for our venture loans remain consistent and we had ample liquidity to pursue investment opportunities with the recent expansion of our credit facility, many of the prospects we evaluated during the second quarter simply did not meet our underwriting criteria. For this reason we chose to pass on most of the fields we evaluated.

At the same time during the second quarter, we experienced positive portfolio outcomes from prepayments and M&A activity. The prepayments and lower level of new originations had the dual effect of reducing the size of our portfolio at quarter end while contributing to arise a strong net investment income which again exceeded our distributions. Additionally, the combination of prepayments and lower originations further strengthened our liquidity position heading into the second half of the year.

To briefly recap, during the second quarter we experienced liquidity events from three portfolio companies including $8.6 million in loan principal prepayments plus interest end of term payments and prepayment fees. The positive liquidity events led us to generate NII of $0.39 per share for the quarter, a 56% increase compared to $0.25 per share in the second quarter of 2015. During the quarter, we realized an attractive portfolio yield of 15.5%. We declared distributions of $0.115 per share payable in each of October, November and December. Including our most recently declared distribution; we have now declared distributions of $8.72 per share since our IPO.

Our coverage ratio for the declared distributions for this quarter was 113% and for the last four quarters was 107%. In April, we added a lender to our banking group and increased our revolving credit facility to $95 million. Although we say contraction of our portfolio during the second quarter, our positive results in the quarter are a direct result of our success in building a diverse and seasoned investment portfolio. Liquidity events are an inherent part of our business model and the liquidity events that occurred this quarter from our maturing portfolio are actual examples of the successful execution of our business model.

While the specific timing of prepayments is often not predictable, we have averaged $11 million in prepayments per quarters since going public in 2010. Considering the size and age of our portfolio, we expect to continue realizing liquidity events for the benefit of our shareholders. As an example of the earnings power of our platform and portfolio, in 2014 we made a $10 million loan to mBlocks. In June 2015, mBlocks approached us looking for flexibility and a liquidity question as it sought to find a strategic buyer for its business. As the incumbent lender, we were able to provide an additional senior secured loan in the amount of $1.5 million that provided the liquidity necessary for the company to have more time and flexibility to negotiate its sale.

In June of this year, mBlocks prior to its sale repaid the additional $1.5 million loan including an end-of-term payment equal to 100% of the original loan amount. This resulted in an IRR of 83% on the additional loan. Subsequently in July 2016, mBlocks completed its strategic sale for $117 million and prepaid our outstanding $8.5 million venture loan plus approximately $760,000 in the aggregate to be recorded as income from our prepayment fee, end of term payment and success fee.

As we move forward in 2016, we continue to execute on Horizons disciplined strategy of sourcing investment opportunities in the form of secured loans to technology and life science companies. This strategy has served us well enabling us to generate strong NII and consistently achieve an attractive portfolio yield. Based on our increased credit facility, the disciplined investment approach we have employed during the second quarter and a steady stream of end-of-term payment, prepayment and success fee income derived from liquidity events, we have substantially improved our liquidity. We will use our enhanced liquidity to pursue high quality opportunities with solid onboarding yields as we seek to grow our portfolio.

Our pipeline for new deals is robust as we continue to see strong demand from the technology and life sciences industry. We expect the combination of origination activity and liquidity events will continue to drive our NII momentum and our ability to provide shareholders a steady stream of cash distributions. Complementing this we continue to expect further upside for my diverse and maturing warrant portfolio.

Gerry will now update you on our business development efforts and market conditions. Chris will then detail our operating results and financial condition. Gerry?

Gerry Michaud

Thanks, Rob. Good morning, everyone. During the second quarter we funded four loans totaling $14.5 million, three of the loans were made to a new portfolio companies and one was made to an existing four-rated portfolio company. We continued to achieve solid onboarding yields over 12% for the quarter. I thought it was reasonably strong demand for our debt products in the second quarter.

Our origination activity reflected our disciplined approach to investment in the face of a lack of quality investment opportunities. As of June 30, Horizon's unfunded loan approvals and commitments totaled $3 million to one company. In addition, so far in the third quarter we have been awarded $32 million and two new transactions. Keep in mind that many of our transactions are trying to keep funding milestones and Horizon may partner a transaction for portfolio diversity and other purposes. So there is no guarantee that transactions awarded and committed backlog will be fully funded by Horizon.

Our pipeline of new opportunities including awarded transactions and committed backlog was approximately $230 million at June 30. We expect to continue to evaluate quality opportunities during the quarter as we move towards meeting our funding goals based on our liquidity and stated leverage optimization. Summing to the level of actual loan prepayments combined with the impact of normal amortization, we expect the net portfolio change for the third quarter could be down $10 million to $15 million, primarily due to expected loan prepayment activity.

Our venture capital investment continue to add historic pace with over $15 billion invested in the second quarter, the number of startup companies receiving capital continue to trend down. We also continue to see a trend of VCs remaining invested in private companies longer with larger and larger equity grants. This trend is evidenced by the fact that according to the National Venture Capital Association, 10 VC-backed companies closed rounds of over $100 million in Q2. We believe the institutional investors and VC funds may soon begin to pressure VCs to exit some of these mega-funded companies and return capital to their funds and their investors. As a result, we expect VCs to return to investing newly raised funds into earlier stage technology and life science companies where valuations are more attractive and value can be built overtime.

We expect this will result in a more early stage VC-backed companies which seek to accelerate growth and meet key technology development milestones to come to the venture debt market to augment their newly raised equity. Second quarter VC fund raising of $8.8 billion was below Q1 levels but was equal to the average of the previous four quarters. VC fund raising is on pace to exceed to $28 billion raised in 2015.

Biotech companies with strong technology platforms and sound clinical development plans continued to attract IPO investors in Q2. However, the IPO bar is significantly higher than it was in 2014 and 2015. 9 of the 12 IPOs in Q2 were completed by Biotech companies. In addition, three VC-backed tech companies went public in the quarter led by Twilio which had the largest IPO raising, $150 million. A positive sign as Twilio was trading at nearly three times its offering price by the end of Q2. While not a trend, Twilio's result might motivate IPO investors to take a hard look at VC-backed tech companies for IPO opportunities.

M&A activity in Q2 was once again dominated by the tech sector. According to NVCA, information technology and internet companies constituted 46 of the 64 reported venture-backed M&A transactions, down 29% from Q1. We continue to view healthcare technology industry as a potential growth area for us and we see significant interest from VC investors who continue to look for quality opportunities in this industry as we seek to grow and maintain a diverse portfolio.

We haven't spent much time recently talking about what is historically been called the clean-tech market. I think it is worth noting, however, that we are seeing new venture capital investment in this market particularly in demand side technologies which reduce energy consumption, the most obvious example of this is a car sharing services that make ownership cheaper by reducing the carbon footprint. Another example of investment in any energy reduction is Big Data Technology companies that help utility companies reduce the cost of their services while creating a much more efficient means of providing energy.

We are also seen investment in Food Processing Technology that reduces energy used in processing and reduces food waste for better healthcare and fresher food to the market more quickly. See the potential for venture-debt investment in the clean technology market, especially for a companies supported by strong VC investment and with proven demand with their markets.

Looking at competition in the venture debt market in the second quarter, we continue to see the tech banks falling back to the more traditional role of providing short-term working capital products. Technology banks continue to provide some competition for life science transactions. As we have been expecting, we are seeing indications that the tech banks are eminently focused on managing their respective portfolios. As a result of a pullback by the technology banks, we are seeing improved pricing as reflected in our ability to obtain attractive onboarding yields across our targeted industries.

With that update, I will now turn the call over to Chris.

Chris Mathieu

Thanks, Gerry, and good morning everyone. Our consolidated financial results for the period ended June 30, 2016 have been presented in our earnings release and our Form 10-Q both distributed after the market closed yesterday.

For the second quarter of 2016, totaling investment income was $9.1 million compared to $6.9 million for the second quarter of 2015. While onboarding yields in our portfolio have remained stable in the 12% to 12.5% range, the increase in interest income of 33% primarily was due to higher interest income on investments resulting from a 12% larger average size of the loan portfolio and $1.7 million higher level of ETP income. Our portfolio yield for the second quarter was 15.5%, consistent with the first quarter and compares favorably to the 13.1% for the second quarter of 2015.

Total expenses were $4.7 million for the second quarter, an 18% increase as compared to $4 million for the second quarter of 2015. Interest expense increased primarily due to a 47% increase in average borrowings while offset by a decrease in our effective cost of debt to an annual rate of 5.8% for the second quarter compared to 6.9% for the second quarter of 2015. Waste management fee expense increased 16% to $1.2 million in the second quarter as compared to $1.1 million in the second quarter of 2015, primarily due to an increase in the average size of the investment portfolio.

Professional fees and general and administrative expenses which consists primarily of legal and audit fees and insurance premiums remained flat for the second quarter compared to the second quarter of 2015. We earned net investment income of $0.39 per share for the second quarter as compared to $0.25 per share in the second quarter of 2015 and $0.38 per share for the first quarter of 2016. After paying current distributions of $0.345 per share and earning $0.39 per share for the second quarter, the company increased its undistributed spillover income as of June 30 to $0.19 per share.

Our NAV as of June 30 was $13.27 per share, a $0.35 per share decrease from the prior quarter. This decrease was primarily due to the portfolio fair value adjustment we took on our loan to NOMi of $3.6 million in the second quarter. The impact on NAV of the fair value decline was partially offset by net investment income generated during the quarter in excess of the distributions declared. We ended the second quarter with an investment portfolio of $233 million which consisted of secured loans to 49 companies with an aggregate fair value of $227 million and a portfolio of warrant and equity positions in 85 companies with an aggregate fair value of $6 million.

New originations in the quarter totaled $14.5 million and those were offset by $14 million in scheduled principal payments and $9 million in principal prepayments. In terms of liquidity, Horizon entered the second quarter with $37 million in available liquidity and including cash and funds available under our credit facility. As of June 30, we had $68 million outstanding under our credit facility. During the second quarter, we announced the addition of a new lender, Union Bank, which committed an additional $25 million increasing the size of the facility to $95 million. The facility contains an accordion feature which allows for an increase upto $150 million. While we have seen a market supply of a variety of leverage products, we have focused on the expansion of commitments under our credit facility as evidenced by the $45 million increase over the last 12 months.

In addition to expanding our credit facility, we continue to have $33 million in publicly traded baby bonds which we expect will hold until maturity in 2019. On our last call I mentioned our intention to refinance the remaining balance on our asset-backed notes. We accomplished this leaving a zero balance as of June 30. Our intention remains to target overall debt levels to a debt-to-equity ratio of 0.75 to 1.0. At June 30, our actual leverage ratio was 0.66 to 1 given the room for growth between our target an actual leverage ratio we expect we can grow our current investment portfolio by $31 million or approximately 41% based on our current NAV and utilization of our currently available committed credit facility.

Lastly I'd like to provide an update on our stock repurchase plan. since approving the stock plan into -- September o2015, we have repurchased over one 110,000 shares, on July 29 the company's board of directors extended the company's previously off right share repurchase program until the earlier of June 30, 2017 for the repurchase of the $5 million of the company's common stock.

Before I open the floor to questions I'd like to note that we plan to hold our next conference call the third of the -- to report third quarter results vary the week of October 31. This concludes our opening remarks and we'll be happy to take questions you may have at this time.

Question-and-Answer Session

Operator

[Operator Instructions] And our first questions comes from Ryan Lynch from KBW. Your line is now open.

Ryan Lynch

Good morning, thank you for taking my questions. The first one just surrounds a New Haven pharmaceutical that looks like that went on not cruel in the quarter, but it still is marked at 100% of your cost of the fair value mark is very strong in that company, but you guys are at the core-end to come off of that, so can you just provide some more color on that investment.

Robert Pomeroy

Sure, it’s on non-cruel iconic cash basis not a cruel and they've paid all but the most recent monthly payment. There's also an end-of-term payment which is on the accrual. That's like Pickens [ph] just going on and not an accrual.

Ryan Lynch

Okay, as you said. So it is on nonaccrual but you got fair value market for Flex and you guys don't expect to take any loss on that.

Robert Pomeroy

Correct. That's the credit rating is a two rating credit, which implies some level of distress in the company but we currently do not expect to have any loss of principal or interest or any of the other components that we're concerned -- contractually entitled to.

Ryan Lynch

Okay. And then just I want to clarify do you guys see the portfolio guidance for Q3 was going to be a net portfolio repayments of $10 million to $15 million.

Robert Pomeroy

That's correct.

Ryan Lynch

So that's going to be I guess the third quarter in a row that you all had negative net portfolio growth, or net repayments say to another way. So what are the drivers really surrounding you guys having you know net repayments over the last several quarters and what changes can you guys make to reverse that actually get some net portfolio growth, as you said you guys do have some capacity to grow your portfolio and increase balance sheet my bridge.

Robert Pomeroy

So you know good question and certainly something we're looking at and is not historically we've actually done quite well on this particular part of our business. You know we just we really see a pause in the market, has been a pause over the last couple of quarters. With many opportunities that we are looking at reflecting companies that have seen slower not no growth but slower growth with already high leverage on their balance sheet, and we just felt like that is especially on the tech side. So we really just felt like these were not opportunities that we should be pursuing in the marketplace today. And we want to, we really wanted to see kind of a return to a stronger growth market.

So that desert out that's really been kind of the pause that has driven maybe the lack of funding for the last couple of quarters. I would note that we have seen a very significant uptick in the quality of transactions we're seeing going into the third quarter, which is very good news was also seen on the life science side and in an uptick in the quantity of transactions and we believe something that we believe for a while which is the way science companies would be coming back to the market here in the second half of 2016. After having burned off a lot of the equity and debt that was available to them in 2014, 2013. So those trends are kind of what we expected and expect to see.

So we think there's going to be more opportunity for us to grow the business going forward, as you well know it takes time to kind of flush those transactions through the pipeline and get them to a position of actually accepting funding deal. So I think that that's true on the funding side. You know on a liquidity side we have really nice aged Technology portfolio now and so we are seeing more M&A activity and more liquidation activity. But not outside of what might be normal. I think is Robert mentions I think if the average out since we've gone public it's been by $11 million per quarter. You know that that's not an outlier number that's pretty good number for an aged technology portfolio. So I think we'll continue to see that at some level but I do think quality of our opportunity was seen in the quantity on science that is better than what we saw coming into this year in the first and second quarter.

Ryan Lynch

That is good to hear, and that is great color, and I definitely think that it's a wise move that if you guys are seeing good deals in the current quarter, it's kind of slow down portfolio growth don't reach just at the deploy capital just to grow your portfolio so I think that's a wise move. So that's all the questions for me, Thanks guys.

Robert Pomeroy

Thanks, Ryan

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from Jonathan Bock at Wells Fargo. Your line is now open.

Jonathan Bock

Good morning and thank you for taking my question and we appreciate kind of the discussion as it relates to NAV and I understand Ryan asked the question related to New Haven [ph] where you said they expect no additional principal loss. And Rob if we rewind the tape just a bit I think you said the same thing and not expecting a realized loss or principal loss on Nomi last quarter and we understand investments can deteriorate faster than expected, but can you walk us through; one, why you feel more confident in New Haven to maintain principle value, and then two, when you stated I think on like May 4, that you didn't expect the principal loss in in Nomi, what really changed from then to now as you were liquidating it.

Robert Pomeroy

So I think that of pieces; first of all, two very different companies and two very different stages. And again market position and statuses reach difficulties will impact that. In the case of Nomi we were at the very, very beginning of a process to decide what to do and how to enter into it. There was interest in the company and its asset that gave us the confidence was just scenario analysis per value. And believed in that value firmly at the time that we published in May, auctions are auctions and processes are process, as a result -- they produce a result and do.

On the other hand, New Haven is a science company with approved product in the market that creates a value proposition that we believe is much more supportable, sustainable today. So again it is a function of the very value process and the prospects that we see for both companies at the time.

Jonathan Bock

That it's a fair question and I do want to just put it out there that no one is expected to that a thousand and clearly the track record of earnings growth etcetera been appreciated so and appreciate the candor on that one investment and understand that you identified that as an outlier relative to a number of other loans that have very good things happening. Perhaps transitioning to just new investments that you're dropping on the books so Gerry when you're originating a new loan to the extent that you find one that you do like, can you give us a sense of what you'd expect that total return including amortize EOT, and let's try to be -- let's not assume that repays early. What type of all-in return proposition are you putting on the books from NOY or earnings perspective if you originate a loan, what type of -- what type of impact does that give you on the revenue line but adding both cash and noncash 10, 11, 12.

Gerry Michaud

We haven't seen a deterioration in yields too much Jonathan, actually you we haven't been losing deals to competition that has not been the issue for us, so it's not been you know we've been at one price in the markets at another price. We just haven't felt that the quality was good enough at any price to do these transactions that we have been seeing in the first part of the year. So we've seen a pullback from the from the tech banks which we totally expected they were very over aggressive and 2013, 2014 even first half of 2015 combined with the M&A that they went through we're seeing a retrenching on their side.

So we're not getting pressure from the banks which is generally what drives pricing down if it's going to be I think most of the other players in the market are fairly rational in their pricing. So we still is fully expect to be in that 10% to 12% range going into a transaction. we also look at the potential upside in the various warrants we're getting, so we may offset some current income that we believe that there's a really quality opportunity at a really good valuation that will lead to further upside later on. Or we might build that into a success feel like as we as we did in mBlocks to turn out you know to have a pretty good result.

So you know we're seeing still very rational pricing in the marketplace and I think with improvement and the quality of the opportunities we're seeing, that that debt should vote well for us as we go into the second half of the year.

Jonathan Bock

Fair enough and appreciate that Gerry, and so and so Rob if we if we take a higher view of the business and see that if there is a view of some amount of the previous repayment activity exceeding new originations, cautious, focusing on a smaller subset alone that are that are going to protect NAV and generate good returns. You know and then you couple that with one or two small little credit items you have out lined, it is now really the time to issue new equity considering that you are now at a level at which you can do so at a minimal impact to NAV

Robert Pomeroy

Jonathan you know we were very focused on the things that we control and those are finding good loans that we can originate, trying to be sure that we have built in profit opportunities from exits or liquidity events if they happen. Trying to protect any of the loans that are under stress, the stock price has improved we're pleased with that but we don't have the NAV today or go low end of today. So we're very focused on just managing our business portfolio.

Jonathan Bock

That's appreciated because I know as folks look at it as a discipline on that item, one could expect the share price to further appreciate the more you keep doing what you've done before. So I thank you for taking our questions and we appreciate.

Robert Pomeroy

Thank you, Jonathan.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from [indiscernible]. Your line is now open.

Unidentified Analyst

Good morning. Just one quick question on New Haven and then I move on obviously you have a lot of color around that. But is there a specific asset that that backing up one that's making that Mark stand a 100% do you guys have specific lateral there.

Robert Pomeroy

As I said is it's a company with an approved product that's on the market revenue producing and so that. Devalue the company that supports our loan.

Unidentified Analyst

Okay. I guess my next question be you guys a talked about the pipeline and last quarter you said and not to not get any price for some of those transactions you saw. So my question would be how bad was that for those I mean and was it in a specific type -- where the life sciences, where those some of the new clean tech ones you guys are still coming out some of the new guys trying to get in, and there's a specific area we should watch for some irrational players there.

Chris Mathieu

No, the market is actually quite down quite a bit since the last couple years where the banks got very aggressive in fact the where some [ph] of the market. We're seeing a very rational market right now, I think relative to pricing relative to structures. We're not really seeing anything that concerns me is you guys can remember I was for about four quarters maybe even longer talking about what I thought was irrational pricing on the life science side during 2013, 2014 and first half of 2015 we've seen that come back now, we're seeing much better pricing on life science transactions, and we are starting to see more of those companies come back to the market as they need additional liquidity which is we think a positive event. So no I mean it's very it's a very rational market, we're very comfortable where we are, we have a great brand name in the marketplace and expect to leverage that over the next few quarters as we have in the past.

Unidentified Analyst

Alright, and then on to we talked about it at $15 billion for the whole VC state quarter but you said you're looking for as it shifts back to early stage funding and that's kind of the trend you guys are looking for to really invest in here, is there and not only timing phases erratic to predict sometimes you know is that six months a year. What's the outlook for that kind of being shift.

Chris Mathieu

Yes I mean I think we're in it and we will begin to see it now over time. I mean the fact of the matter is these $100 million [Ph] deals in a quarter just three five years ago would have been unforgiven the venture of lending and excuse me -- in the venture capital market so I think this is more of what place now where it's full of concern to institutional investors relative to the capital they put in VC funds.

And so in VC funds are not finding enough places to be able to do $100 million deals in the marketplace, and just you know that's just not a rational place for venture capital just ask more of a private equity type marketplace so. An institutional investors want their money back at some point you know the V.C. funds are generally ten year funds, many of them are some of their old funds are coming up on that, they need to start returning this capital so there are going to speak start to need to execute some of these major -- mega companies to with high valuations and redeploy that capital, and we are confident it will be redeployed in lower valuation companies, earlier stage companies.

There are there are some new technology fronts as I mentioned especially in the clean tech side we're seeing a lot of interest in some areas there that are more demand driven instead of what has happened in clean tech before, where it was all well build-in and then everybody will come and buy the product solar energy being a good example. You know the market today is being more driven by commands for products, they improved quality of life and so we think that that is a good place for VC we have seen and are and will continue to see it as a place where they will come to continue to invest, along with health care technology, where there's a kind of a merging of technology and life science to again move drugs to clinical trials faster, and things like that that are in a sizable market.

so we like it when we're starting to see you know new technologies instead of just down more investment and technologies that have that kind of had their run, and that's we expect to see over the next at least four to eight quarters.

Unidentified Analyst

Okay, perfect thank you. That's all for me.

Operator

Thank you. And the next question will come from Casey Alexander at Compass Point Research. Your line is now open.

Casey Alexander

Good morning. The mBlocks bridge loan had a 100% end of term payment that if I'm correct you were occurring that ratably over the course of the last year, is that right.

Robert Pomeroy

The -- partially right the normal accounting for ETPs is to accrue it ratably over the term of the financing which was a year, unless you're not totally certain about its collectability and when we first started the loan because the take out was an acquisition we did not accrue the ETP for the first six months of the term of the loan until we're well into the LOI stage and there was much, much more certainty in the transaction being completed. So in this transaction income was only taken during Q1 and Q2 of 2016. So $750 in each of those periods as opposed to over the period.

Casey Alexander

Alright. So that's had a really good -- that one loan has had a real beneficial impact on your portfolio yield the last couple quarters. Is it reasonable for us to assume that there is likely to be a considerably lower portfolio yield in the next couple quarters absent the mBlocks ETP accrual?

Chris Mathieu

I think if you -- certainly mBlocks will not be a contributor to future periods beyond what Rob already talked about for the larger mBlocks loans that paid off in Q3. So there will be some impact on a positive way as already described. The impact on future quarters on ETP will come from other transactions that are mature much like Gerry described with a mature portfolio, we have other shots on goal as it relates to ETP acceleration from the portfolio.

Casey Alexander

Okay. Alright, the rest of my questions have been asked and answered. So I appreciate it, thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question will come from Christopher Testa at National Securities. Your line is now open.

Christopher Testa

Good morning, guys. Thanks for taking my questions. Just with the discussion around the deals being tested over during the quarter, a lot of opportunities that were passed over. Can you just give us some color on those whether in general it would because -- we borrowed -- wanted too much leverage, was it pricing or was it just the quality of the deals? And if there was any specific vertical, would it be poor quality deals or more concentrated?

Chris Mathieu

So I don't want to be too simplistic about this but for the most part what we saw in the technology side were companies that were coming to the market with a lower growth story that they expected to turn around but they had taken on a substantial amount of leverage over the last couple years to get to where they were in their growth. And so we saw our companies that had very nice growth over the last couple of years but now the growth was slowing, investors were not putting in additional equity, not that they would -- they didn't indicate they were supportive but they were not putting in additional equity, and they were trying to add further leverage to the company to get them to whatever their new growth strategy was, to increase growth going forward.

And we just didn't see enough support from the investors, relative -- not based on what they said but what they were actually doing. We were concerned that the valuations of these companies were at a point where the investors would be concerned that if that growth didn't happen going forward, their investment could be impaired at some level. And we just didn't find those kinds of transactions supportable with additional leverage, so we definitely paused on those for the better half of the first part of the year. And then I think again, there were other things but for the most part, that was the primary driver and us not being able to find the quality opportunities that we had hoped to find in the first two quarters.

This is not totally outside of what happens in our industry at times, especially when technologies have kind of run their course; whether it's software or whatever it might be; and so you kind of have to see this pause by the new technologies, they're are going to advance in the markets, come to light and there is more healthy investment in that. And we did decide to see that again in the second half of the year and between that and growth in the life science opportunities, I'm fairly optimistic about the second half of this year, certainly going into next year.

Christopher Testa

That's great color, thank you. And just what the ABS completely run-off and now you've -- kind of expanded the borrowing base on the credit facility. Rates are low, should we be expecting potentially another fixed rate issuance from you guys at some point in the next several quarters?

Chris Mathieu

No, I think we've tried to be clear that based on our target leverage, we have the commitments on our facility for a little over two years now. So I think we'll be doing no fixed rate financing, I think the securitization was great for us over the past three years but that's right in its course and it's really about the revolving feature of the credit facility that is now in placed with KeyBanc.

Christopher Testa

Got it. And just on the -- the no mean, non-accrual, just -- can you give us some color on which assets are now being sold. I know you'd mentioned it was the hardware business just what assets are being liquidated during the current quarter -- what types of assets are those and I guess what's the degree of certainty of these kind of being sold at the mark but how liquidity are these or how often are these used, etcetera?

Chris Mathieu

Yes, this is actually a combination of both tangible and intangible, most of them are in the area -- most of the value remains in some intellectual property and on the software aspects of the business, as well as some lumpy accounts receivables with very good credit. So we're very feeling pretty good about the market we have as of the end of the quarter.

Christopher Testa

Okay, great. That's all for me. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And there are no further questions at this time. I would now like to turn the call back over to Robert Pomeroy, Chairman & CEO for closing comments.

Robert Pomeroy

Thank you. To summarize, during the second quarter our investment activity reflected our disciplined investment process as we continued to experience solid demand for our loan products and had ample liquidity to compete for those investment opportunities. We also continue to generate net investment income during the quarter in excess of our distributions due to our attractive portfolio yield which was driven by positive M&A prepayments. Our success in generating NII bolster our ability to provide stable distributions to our shareholders.

We've now entered the second half of 2016 with an enhanced liquidity position which provides many opportunities for us to pursue our pipeline of debt investments with attractive risk adjusted returns. We also remain optimistic about the ability of our diversified and maturing warrant portfolio to provide additional upside to our shareholders. We want to thank you for your interest in Horizon and we look forward to sharing our progress with you again in November. This concludes our conference call. And thank you, and have a great day.

Copyright policy: All transcripts on this site are the copyright of Seeking Alpha. However, we view them as an important resource for bloggers and journalists, and are excited to contribute to the democratization of financial information on the Internet. (Until now investors have had to pay thousands of dollars in subscription fees for transcripts.) So our reproduction policy is as follows: You may quote up to 400 words of any transcript on the condition that you attribute the transcript to Seeking Alpha and either link to the original transcript or to www.SeekingAlpha.com. All other use is prohibited.

THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HERE IS A TEXTUAL REPRESENTATION OF THE APPLICABLE COMPANY'S CONFERENCE CALL, CONFERENCE PRESENTATION OR OTHER AUDIO PRESENTATION, AND WHILE EFFORTS ARE MADE TO PROVIDE AN ACCURATE TRANSCRIPTION, THERE MAY BE MATERIAL ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR INACCURACIES IN THE REPORTING OF THE SUBSTANCE OF THE AUDIO PRESENTATIONS. IN NO WAY DOES SEEKING ALPHA ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY INVESTMENT OR OTHER DECISIONS MADE BASED UPON THE INFORMATION PROVIDED ON THIS WEB SITE OR IN ANY TRANSCRIPT. USERS ARE ADVISED TO REVIEW THE APPLICABLE COMPANY'S AUDIO PRESENTATION ITSELF AND THE APPLICABLE COMPANY'S SEC FILINGS BEFORE MAKING ANY INVESTMENT OR OTHER DECISIONS.

If you have any additional questions about our online transcripts, please contact us at: transcripts@seekingalpha.com. Thank you!