Trump's Tax Plan Could Cost You - Here's What To Do About It

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Includes: AFB, AKP, AYN, BAB, BAF, BBF, BBK, BBN, BFK, BFO, BFY, BFZ, BHV, BJZ, BKK, BKN, BLE, BLH, BLJ, BNJ, BNY, BPK, BQH, BSD, BSE, BTA, BTT, BYM, BZM, CCA, CEV, CMF, CMU, CXE, CXH, DMB, DMF, DSM, DTF, EIA, EIM, EIO, EIP, EIV, EMI, EMJ, ENX, EOT, ETX, EVJ, EVLMC, EVM, EVN, EVO, EVP, EVY, EXD, FMB, FMN, FPT, GBAB, GMMB, HYD, HYMB, IBME, IBMF, IBMG, IBMH, IBMI, IBMJ, IBMK, IIM, IQI, ITM, ITML, ITMS, KSM, KTF, LEO, MAB, MAV, MCA, MEAR, MEN, MFL, MFM, MFT, MHD, MHE, MHF, MHI, MHN, MIW, MIY, MLN, MMD, MMU, MMV, MNE, MNP, MPA, MQT, MQY, MTT, MUA, MUB, MUC, MUE, MUH, MUI, MUJ, MUNI, MUS, MVF, MVT, MYC, MYD, MYF, MYI, MYJ, MYN, MZA, MZF, NAC, NAD, NAN, NAZ, NBB, NBH, NBO, NBW, NCA, NCB, NEA, NEV, NHA, NID, NIM, NJV, NKG, NKX, NMI, NMT, NMY, NMZ, NNC, NNY, NOM, NPN, NPV, NQP, NRK, NTC, NTX, NUM, NUO, NUV, NUW, NVG, NXC, NXJ, NXN, NXP, NXQ, NXR, NYF, NYH, NYV, NZF, OIA, PCK, PCQ, PMF, PML, PMM, PMO, PMX, PNF, PNI, PRB, PVI, PWZ, PYN, PZA, PZC, PZT, RVNU, SBI, SHM, SHYD, SMB, SMMU, SUB, TFI, VCF, VCV, VFL, VGM, VKI, VKMMX, VKQ, VMM, VMO, VPV, VTEB, VTN, XMPT
by: Frank Holmes

Summary

Tax Reform Unlikely to Happen Anytime Soon.

Plus, You Could End Up Paying More in Taxes.

But What About Rising Interest Rates?

Top earners have traditionally been attracted to municipal bonds for their tax-exempt status at the federal and often state and local levels. In the wake of President Donald Trump's stunning upset victory, however, muni investors were forced to readjust their expectations of fiscal policy going forward. Because Trump had campaigned on deep cuts to corporate and personal income taxes, equities soared while munis sold off, ending a near-record 54 weeks of net inflows.

This appears to have been premature, for a couple of reasons.

Tax Reform Unlikely to Happen Anytime Soon

House Speaker Ryan: We

As I explained to you this week, Trump and congressional Republicans are currently butting heads on how best to handle tax reform, with many lawmakers saying it's unlikely they'll get around to it during the new president's first 100 days, and possibly his first 200 days.

According to House Speaker Paul Ryan, Congress will focus instead on replacing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and funding Trump's $1 trillion infrastructure spending package before it worries about taxes. With an estimated 30 million Americans enrolled on Obamacare exchanges, finding a suitable replacement is of high importance and might take some time. The same goes with negotiating a costly infrastructure deal, which several fiscally conservative lawmakers are hesitant to support.

Besides, we all know how fast Congress operates, even on a good day. Former President Barack Obama took office in January 2009, and even with a Democratic majority in the House and Senate, his signature health care law didn't reach his desk until March the following year.

All of this is to say that it might be premature to start dumping your munis, or withhold an investment in munis, purely on the notion that income taxes are about to get a haircut. We're probably looking at many more months of Obama-era tax rates, including the 3.8 percent Obamacare surcharge on investment income.

Other investors have realized this as well, which is why we're seeing positive net inflows back into muni bond funds.

Plus, You Could End Up Paying More in Taxes

If enacted as conceived, Trump's tax reform plan would indeed be the most significant in decades, simplifying the number of tax brackets from seven to three, lowering the top rate from 39.6 percent to 33 percent and eliminating personal exemptions and filing status options.

Trump

One of the unintended consequences of this is that income taxes could actually go up for certain middle-income filers. According to an analysis of Trump's proposal by the independent Tax Policy Center, as many as 8 million American families, including a majority of single-parent households and large families, could end up paying more than they do now (emphasis mine):

Increasing the standard deduction would significantly reduce the number of filers who itemize. We estimate that 27 million (60 percent) of the 45 million filers who would otherwise itemize in 2017 would opt for the standard deduction. Repealing personal exemptions and the head of household filing status, however, would cause many large families and single parents to face tax increases.

What this means is that tax-exempt muni bonds could still play a valuable role in your portfolio.

But What About Rising Interest Rates?

In December, the Federal Reserve lifted interest rates for only the second time in nearly a decade, and many expect to see up to three additional increases this year.

It's important to be aware that when rates rise, bond prices fall because if newly issued bonds carry a higher yield, the value of existing bonds with lower rates declines.

This is why I believe investors should take advantage of short- and intermediate-term munis, which are less sensitive to rate increases than longer-term bonds, whose maturities are further out.

To learn more, check out

"5 Reasons Why Short-Term Municipal Bonds Make Sense Now."

Please consider carefully a fund's investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses.

Morningstar Ratings are based on risk-adjusted return. The Morningstar Rating for a fund is derived from a weighted-average of the performance figures associated with its three-, five- and ten-year (if applicable) Morningstar Rating metrics. Past performance does not guarantee future results. For each fund with at least a three-year history, Morningstar calculates a Morningstar Rating based on a Morningstar Risk-Adjusted Return measure that accounts for variation in a fund's monthly performance (including the effects of sales charges, loads, and redemption fees), placing more emphasis on downward variations and rewarding consistent performance. The top 10% of funds in each category receive 5 stars, the next 22.5% receive 4 stars, the next 35% receive 3 stars, the next 22.5% receive 2 stars and the bottom 10% receive 1 star. (Each share class is counted as a fraction of one fund within this scale and rated separately, which may cause slight variations in the distribution percentages.)

Bond funds are subject to interest-rate risk; their value declines as interest rates rise. Though the Near-Term Tax Free Fund seeks minimal fluctuations in share price, it is subject to the risk that the credit quality of a portfolio holding could decline, as well as risk related to changes in the economic conditions of a state, region or issuer. These risks could cause the fund's share price to decline. Tax-exempt income is federal income tax free. A portion of this income may be subject to state and local taxes and at times the alternative minimum tax. The Near-Term Tax Free Fund may invest up to 20% of its assets in securities that pay taxable interest. Income or fund distributions attributable to capital gains are usually subject to both state and federal income taxes.

All opinions expressed and data provided are subject to change without notice. Some of these opinions may not be appropriate to every investor.

U.S. Global Investors, Inc. is an investment adviser registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). This does not mean that we are sponsored, recommended, or approved by the SEC, or that our abilities or qualifications in any respect have been passed upon by the SEC or any officer of the SEC.

This commentary should not be considered a solicitation or offering of any investment product.

Certain materials in this commentary may contain dated information. The information provided was current at the time of publication.

Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours.

I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it. I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

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