Pirie, Derivatives

by: Brenda Jubin

Wendy L. Pirie’s Derivatives and its companion Workbook (Wiley, 2017) are part of the CFA [Chartered Financial Analyst] Institute Investment Series, books “geared toward industry practitioners along with graduate-level finance students.” The main text is a hefty 600 pages; the workbook is about 100 pages. The text’s nine chapters cover derivative markets and instruments, basics of derivative pricing and valuation, pricing and valuation of forward commitments, valuation of contingent claims, derivatives strategies, risk management, risk management applications of forward and futures strategies, risk management applications of option strategies, and risk management applications of swap strategies. Contributing chapters to this text are Don M. Chance (who does most of the heavy lifting), Robert E. Brooks, Barbara Valbuzzi, Robert E. Brooks, David M. Gentle, Robert A. Strong, Russell A. Rhoads, Kenneth Grant, and John R. Marsland.

This set is not for the casual reader who has only a passing interest in derivatives. It’s a textbook for those who want a solid foundation in derivatives, a foundation from which to engage in financial engineering, managing a trading book, or managing client portfolios. Or for those who simply have a keen interest in financial markets and want more in-depth insight into how derivatives can be used to hedge as well as to speculate.

Here’s but a single example of how derivatives, in this case equity swaps, can be useful: reducing insider exposure. Let’s say the personal wealth of the founder of a publicly traded company is almost entirely exposed to the fortunes of that company. The founder controls about 10% of the company and wants to retain this degree of control, so he doesn’t want to sell any of his shares. A swap dealer might offer him the following deal: the founder would pay the dealer the return on some of his shares in exchange for a diversified portfolio return. In this way the founder would keep his level of control but reduce his risk.