National Stock Yards' Real Estate Value Exceeds Its Market Cap

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About: National Stock Yards Co. (NSYC)
by: Eric Schleien
Summary

In this episode of the Intelligent Investing Podcast, Eric Schleien and Anthony Waldichuk discuss National Stock Yards Co.

The business is a thinly traded OTC company with a possible value-creating catalyst.

It seems likely the real estate is worth more than the entire market cap.

In episode #48 of the Intelligent Investing Podcast, I sat down with Anthony Waldichuk to discuss National Stock Yards Co. (OTCPK:NSYC).

The company is very small — a $12 million market cap. The main operating business is a stockyard business in Oklahoma City. The company conducts daily cattle auctions and is a pretty boring business.

However, what's interesting is its non-existent side business. The company owned the Armour meat packing plant. But that business shut down, and is now a large plot of land totaling just under 200 acres.

National Stock Yards still has 191 acres of this land after selling 11 acres for $890,000 two years ago. It appears this land is undervalued on the books, as the company has this real estate on the balance sheet for $3 million.

With a $12 million market cap, it's likely the real estate is worth more than the entire market cap, giving you the stockyard business for free.

I think a lot of these land plays are value traps. Often the management team has no incentive to monetize its real estate holdings, and the company ends up producing poor returns on capital for many years, leading to dead money.

However, this company is interested in selling off its real estate, and cash raised will most likely be returned to shareholders in the form of dividends. Buybacks are simply out of the question, as the stock is too illiquid.

Currently, the company pays a dividend yield of about 7%, which is funded solely from the stockyard business — so you get paid to wait around while it sells off the real estate. Furthermore, the stock currently trades at a 20% to 30% discount to tangible book value.

In addition to the real estate holdings, the company also owns a 50% interest in a golf course, which it carries on the books at $0.

The business also has $2 million of cash on hand and no debt.

In conclusion, we have a company trading at a discount to tangible book value, a greater discount to probable real estate holdings, a situation where real estate is being sold off, and getting paid to wait around.

Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it (other than from Seeking Alpha). I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

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