As The Fed Reflates The Stock Bubble, The Economy Crumbles

Summary

After going vertical starting December 26th, the Dow had been moving sideways since January 18th, possibly getting ready to tip over. The FOMC took care of that with its policy directive on January 30th.

Notwithstanding the Fed's efforts to reflate the stock bubble - or at least an attempt to prevent the stock market from succumbing to the gravity of deteriorating fundamentals - at some point the stock market is going to head south abruptly again.

The Fed sees something in the numbers that sent them retreating abruptly and quickly from any attempt to tighten monetary policy.

I get a kick out of these billionaires and centimillionaires, like Kyle Bass yesterday, who appeared on financial television to look the viewer in the eye and tell them that economy is booming. Kyle Bass doesn't expect a mild recession until mid-2020. Hmmm... explain that rationale to the 78%+ households who are living paycheck to paycheck, bloated with a record level of debt and barely enough savings to cover a small emergency.

After dining on a lunch fit for Elizabethan royalty with Trump, Jerome Powell decided it was a good idea to make an attempt at reflating the stock bubble. After going vertical starting December 26th, the Dow had been moving sideways since January 18th, possibly getting ready to tip over. The FOMC took care of that with its policy directive on January 30th, two hours before the stock market closed. Notwithstanding the Fed's efforts to reflate the stock bubble - or at least an attempt to prevent the stock market from succumbing to the gravity of deteriorating fundamentals - at some point the stock market is going to head south abruptly again. That might be the move that precipitates the renewal of money printing.

Contrary to the official propaganda, the economy must be in far worse shape than can be gleaned from the publicly available data if the Fed is willing to stop nudging rates higher a quarter of a point at a time and hint at the possibility of more money printing "if needed." Remember, the Fed has access to much more detailed and accurate data than is made available to the public, including Wall Street. The Fed sees something in the numbers that sent them retreating abruptly and quickly from any attempt to tighten monetary policy.

For me, this graphic conveys the economic reality as well as any economic report:

The chart above shows the Wall Street analyst consensus earnings growth rate for each quarter in 2019. Over the last three months, the analyst consensus EPS forecast has been reduced 8% to almost no earnings growth expected in Q1 2019. Keep in mind that analyst forecasts are based on management "guidance." The nearest next quarter always has the sharpest pencil applied to projections, because corporate CFOs have most of the numbers that go into "guidance." As you can see, earnings growth rate projections have deteriorated precipitously for all four quarters. The little "U" turn in Q4 is the obligatory "hockey stick" of optimism forecast.

Perhaps one of the best "grassroots" fundamental indicators is the mood of small businesses, considered the backbone of the U.S. economy. After hitting a peak reading of 120 in 2018, the Small Business Confidence Index fell of a cliff in January to 95. The index is compiled by Vistage Worldwide, which compiles a monthly survey of 765 small businesses. Just 14% expect the economy to improve this year, and 36% expect it to get worse. For the first time since the 2016 election, small businesses were more pessimistic about their own financial prospects than they were a year earlier, including plans for hiring and investment.

The Vistage measure of small business "confidence" was reinforced by the National Federation of Independent Businesses confidence index, which plunged to its lowest level since Trump elected. It seems the "hope" that was infused into the American psyche and which drove the stock market to nose-bleed valuation levels starting in November 2016 has leaked out of the bubble. The Fed will not be able to replace that hot air with money printing.

I would argue that small businesses are a reflection of the sentiment and financial condition of the average household, as these are typically locally-based service and retail businesses. The sharp drop in confidence in small businesses correlates with the sharp drop in the Conference Board's consumer confidence numbers.

The negative economic data flowing from the private sector thus reflects a much different reality than is represented by the sharp rally in the stock market since Christmas and the general level of the stock market. At some point, the stock market will "catch down" to reality. This move will likely occur just as abruptly and quickly as the rally of the last 6 weeks.

Editor’s Note: The summary bullets for this article were chosen by Seeking Alpha editors.