Book Summary Of Where Are The Customers' Yachts

by: Movement Capital
Summary

Some things never change - this book written in 1940 and is still relevant for investors in 2019.

The biggest problem for most investors is their own emotions. The best portfolio is the one you’ll actually stick with.

The ability to sit still is a superpower. Most people suffer from an inability to do nothing.

Book cover of Where Are the Customers

Where are the Customers’ Yachts was written in 1940 by Fred Schwed, an investment professional. It’s one of my favorite books on markets and I’m sure it will still be timeless 80 years from now.

The origin of the title:

Explanation of the title to the book Where are the Customers Source: Page 1 of Where are the Customers’ Yachts

Here are my takeaways from the book plus some great quotes:

  • Making money is different than sounding smart. “I don’t know” is the most difficult answer – but usually the correct one. Some financial professionals have invented a new language for saying nothing in a variety of ways.

Source: Page 17 of Where are the Customers’ Yachts

  • Knowing a problem doesn’t mean you know the solution. For example, some Canadian pension funds are leveraging their portfolios (EWC) because low expected returns raise the likelihood of future deficits. They identified a problem – but I’m not confident the solution is to lever up ten years into an economic expansion with high valuations and low yields.

Source: Page 21 of Where are the Customers’ Yachts

  • The biggest problem for most investors is their own emotions. This is a trope in financial writing – but it’s so true. If you constantly jump between different strategies you’ll look up at 65 and have little to show for all your years of saving. The best portfolio is the one you’ll actually stick with.
  • Safe investments can fall out of fashion. Canal bonds were considered safe until railroads upended the canal industry. Russian government bonds were staples of European investment portfolios (RSX) until the 1917 revolution wiped out their value.

Source: Page 3 of Where are the Customers’ Yachts

  • The truth about most investors. Most investors don’t admit they are expert rationalizers in finding profound reasons for hunches. “The inability to grasp ultimate realities is the outstanding mental deficiency of the speculator.” Some investors would rather go broke than admit their guess was wrong.

Source: Page 26 of Where are the Customers’ Yachts

  • The ability to sit still is a superpower. Most people “suffer from the inability to do nothing.” Some investors want to own as many securities as possible. Occasionally I get asked why I don’t make satellite allocations to assets like REITs (REIT) or gold (GLD). I wrote an article showing why. A 5% tilt might make an investor feel diversified but it doesn’t impact portfolio performance.

The book is a rare combination of wisdom and wit – I highly recommend it.

Disclosure: I/we have no positions in any stocks mentioned, and no plans to initiate any positions within the next 72 hours. I wrote this article myself, and it expresses my own opinions. I am not receiving compensation for it. I have no business relationship with any company whose stock is mentioned in this article.

Additional disclosure: Movement Capital (MVMT Capital LLC) is a registered investment advisor. Advisory services are only offered to clients or prospective clients where Movement Capital is properly licensed or exempt from licensure. This article is solely for informational purposes. Investments involve risk and are not guaranteed. No advice may be rendered by Movement Capital unless a client agreement is in place.