Marks And Spencer: The Destroyer Of Shareholder Value

John Kingham profile picture
John Kingham
2.26K Followers

Summary

  • Over the last 20 years M&S has retained about £2.5 billion of shareholders’ earnings to invest in the existing business, to make acquisitions, to buy back shares and so on.
  • And yet, after all that hard work and investment of cold hard (shareholders’) cash, the company’s share price is lower today than it was 20 years ago.
  • So in my latest article for Master Investor magazine I wanted to outline two red flags which, for many years, have suggested M&S was a no-go zone for long-term investors.

I like Marks and Spencer (OTCQX:MAKSF) (OTCQX:MAKSY). No really, I do.

I used to buy most of my clothes from M&S back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when I was in my late teens and early 20s. The clothes were well made, the designs were mainstream and the consistency of quality and sizing was second to none (at least in my local high street).

But that was a very long time ago and since then M&S has lurched from crisis to crisis, carrying out what seems to be an endless transformation project to “make M&S special again”.

This endless transformation has been incredibly expensive. For example, over the last 20 years M&S has retained about £2.5 billion of shareholders’ earnings to invest in the existing business, to make acquisitions, to buy back shares and so on. And yet, after all that hard work and investment of cold hard (shareholders’) cash, the company’s share price is lower today than it was 20 years ago.

For most shareholders then, M&S has been a disaster for at least two decades.

So in my latest article for Master Investor magazine I wanted to outline two red flags which, for many years, have suggested M&S was a no-go zone for long-term investors:

BY JOHN KINGHAM
16

Original Post

Editor's Note: The summary bullets for this article were chosen by Seeking Alpha editors.

This article was written by

John Kingham profile picture
2.26K Followers
I write about high-quality UK dividend growth stocks and value them on an intrinsic value basis using discounted dividend models.
Follow
To ensure this doesn’t happen in the future, please enable Javascript and cookies in your browser.
Is this happening to you frequently? Please report it on our feedback forum.
If you have an ad-blocker enabled you may be blocked from proceeding. Please disable your ad-blocker and refresh.