Dirt as a Growth Industry

|
Includes: CAT, DE, MTW
by: Paul Kedrosky

dirt There is a fascinating piece in the September issue of National Geographic on how dirt is becoming a growth industry. With food demand accelerating, and millions of acres of agricultural land degraded via salination and over-use, and other land becoming fallow due to compaction, this is a pressing topic, and an area ripe for innovation.

Big, heavy machines like the harvesters mash wet soil into an undifferentiated, nigh impenetrable slab—a process called compaction. Roots can't penetrate compacted ground; water can't drain into the earth and instead runs off, causing erosion. And because compaction can occur deep in the ground, it can take decades to reverse. Farm-equipment companies, aware of the problem, put huge tires on their machines to spread out the impact. And farmers are using satellite navigation to confine vehicles to specific paths, leaving the rest of the soil untouched. Nonetheless, this kind of compaction remains a serious issue—at least in nations where farmers can afford $400,000 harvesters.

Unfortunately, compaction is just one, relatively small piece in a mosaic of interrelated problems afflicting soils all over the planet. In the developing world, far more arable land is being lost to human-induced erosion and desertification, directly affecting the lives of 250 million people. In the first — and still the most comprehensive — study of global soil misuse, scientists at the International Soil Reference and Information Centre (ISRIC) in the Netherlands estimated in 1991 that humankind has degraded more than 7.5 million square miles of land. Our species, in other words, is rapidly trashing an area the size of the United States and Canada combined.

 

More here on how Haiti has lost the ability to feed itself.

About this article:

Expand
Tagged: , , , Farm & Construction Machinery
Want to share your opinion on this article? Add a comment.
Disagree with this article? .
To report a factual error in this article, click here