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After Avandia: Does the FDA Have a Drug Problem?

|Includes: GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)
This could have been titled, "Does America Have an FDA Problem?"  My yellow highlighting and red comments. - Ilene

After Avandia: Does the FDA Have a Drug Problem?

MIAMI - JULY 14: A bottle of the diabetes drug, Avandia is seen on July 14, 2010 in Miami, Florida. Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel voted to recommend that GlaxoSmithKline PLC

By Massimo Calabresi with Alice Park, courtesy of TIME 

Five days before a 2007 article in the New England Journal of Medicine showed that the diabetes drug Avandia was linked to a 43% increase in heart attacks compared with other medications or placebos, a group of scientists and executives from the drug’s maker, GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK), gathered in a conference room at the offices of the Food and Drug Administration in White Oak, Md. The GSK goal: to convince regulators that the evidence that the company’s $3 billion-a-year blockbuster drug caused heart problems was inconclusive. To do that, the GSK officials focused not on heart-attack data but on a broader, less well defined category of heart problems called myocardial ischemia. The most recent studies of Avandia, the GSK officials told the FDA, had "yielded information that is inconsistent with an increased risk of myocardial ischemic events," according to sealed court proceedings obtained by TIME.

What GSK didn’t tell the FDA was that on May 14, 2007, two days before the White Oak meeting, GSK’s Global Safety Board had noted that a new assessment of Avandia studies "strengthens the [cardiac-risk] signal observed in the [previous] analysis." Or that eight days earlier, the company’s head of research and development, Moncef Slaoui, had sent an e-mail to its chief medical officer saying Avandia patients showed an "increased risk of ischemic event ranging from 30% to 43%!" Or that the day before the meeting, the company had produced a preliminary draft report that showed patients on Avandia had a 46% greater likelihood of heart attack than those in a control group.


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