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eBay & Resolution Do Not Go Together.

|Includes: eBay Inc. (EBAY)

eBay revealed that they are trying to move dispute resolution from Paypal to eBay by the end of 2009. This is a highly debated move and it contains many aspects, but the one that stands out the most is the new [to eBay/Paypal, not credit card companies] policy about counterfeit items. 

What happens if a buyer believes an item is not authentic?
When buyers file a claim alleging that the item is not authentic, we require the buyer to destroy the item. Once a buyer confirms destruction of the item, we will reimburse the buyer or provide an eBay coupon. 

Source: http://pages.ebay.com/...

 

This policy has been around with credit card companies, but this is very new to the online marketplace and this seems to favor the scammer even more. Let’s take a case in which a legitimate seller is listing authentic Gucci purses and unfortunately runs into an illegitimate buyer [this happens all the time]. The transaction takes place on eBay and everything seems fine until the item is received. Then, the seller gets a notice in his inbox that notifies him that his Paypal account has been frozen due to receipt of item ‘Not&a... Now, Paypal asks the seller to fax in documents, etc. which takes days and sometimes weeks to sort out. Meanwhile, the seller cannot withdraw money from his Paypal account to pay bills/suppliers/etc.&a...

With the new procedure, eBay would require the buyer to destroy the handbag. I’d say, in 9 out of 10 cases, the buyer would ... report that the item has bee... actually destroying it as what a normal person in their right mind would do. No... seller would&nbsp... of luck as he cannot even prove the handbag is realanymore. I have always sided with the fact that all of these protection policies and dispute resolution outcomes favor the crook and I think that’s what the majority thinks as well. Sites such as Bonanzle and Wigix have played it smart and left dispute resolution to the payment processors.