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Greece: the worst is yet come

|Includes: ProShares UltraShort Euro ETF (EUO), UUP
I think it is a given that Greece will have to default, everyone knows this, but they are just playing cat and mouse for now. Most Greeks are dead set against the new Austerity measures and they will likely throw this government out of power for the new changes they have instilled. The next government will cater to the people’s needs for fear of receiving the same treatment. Change is not wanted in Greece. The only way to fix this problem is if the nation as a whole understands that they have to go through a painful period of cuts, but as evidenced from the past riots this is not the case. The story below further substantiates our claims.
Greek unions announced on Wednesday that they would stage a 24-hour nationwide strike on May 20, the second major protest against tough austerity measures pledged in exchange for billions of euros in aid. The main public and private sector led a 50,000-strong march a week ago in which hundreds of angry Greeks fought pitched battles with police in the streets of central Athens and three people were killed in a petrol bomb attack on a local bank.
They are due to march in the capital on Wednesday from 6 p.m. (1500 GMT), in a rally which will give indications about the public mood before the big walkout next week. Investors are closely watching public reaction to government wage and pension cuts amid concerns broader unrest could hit Prime Minister George Papandreou's resolve in pushing them through. New figures published on Wednesday showed Greece's economy contracted 0.8 percent in the first quarter compared to the last three months of 2009.
The austerity measures, pledged in return for 110 billion euros ($139.7 billion) in emergency aid from the European Union and International Monetary Fund, are expected to keep the economy in recession through 2011."The IMF will not stop thirsting for workers' blood," said Yannis Panagopoulos, chairman of Greece's main private sector labor union GSEE. "Its recipes are a disaster and the government must turn them down."
 The country's socialist government on Monday unveiled a draft law to raise the average retirement age and cuts benefits, which further angered unions already opposed to previous steps including public wage cuts and tax hikes. Full story
Adding to the host of problems is the fact that Greece is now officially in a recession. Painful cuts have to be implemented and maintained or Greece will default. Sometimes markets should be allowed to settle matters, intervention only delays the inevitable. Our stance has been that the Euro is going to trade down to the 115 ranges and could possibly trade down to the 110 ranges. The massive 1 trillion Package had no lasting impact on the Euro, after mounting a brief rally, the Euro crumbled and is now on its way to putting in another series of new lows.